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The Resource Voyager : seeking newer worlds in the third great age of discovery, Stephen J. Pyne

Voyager : seeking newer worlds in the third great age of discovery, Stephen J. Pyne

Label
Voyager : seeking newer worlds in the third great age of discovery
Title
Voyager
Title remainder
seeking newer worlds in the third great age of discovery
Statement of responsibility
Stephen J. Pyne
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
A new account of the Voyager space program--its history, scientific impact, and cultural legacy. Launched in 1977, the two unmanned Voyager spacecraft have completed their Grand Tour to the four outer planets, and they are now on course to become the first man-made objects to exit our solar system. To many, this remarkable achievement is the culmination of a golden age of American planetary exploration, begun in the wake of the 1957 Sputnik launch. More than this, Voyager may be one of the purest expressions of exploration in human history. For more than five hundred years the West has been powered by the impulse to explore, to push into a wider world. In this highly original book, Stephen Pyne recasts Voyager in the tradition of Magellan, Columbus, Cook, Lewis and Clark, and other landmark explorers.--From publisher description
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ “The saga of the Voyagers’ trek is carrying the inherited narrative of exploration to its outer limits,” writes environmental historian Pyne (How the Canyon Became Grand ). By looking at the mission of Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 and comparing it with past voyages of discovery on Earth, Pyne offers a unique and engrossing history of the Western world’s love affair with such journeys. The two space probes were launched on a “Grand Tour” of space in 1977; both are still traveling and returning data to Earth, with Voyager 2 leaving the solar system. Pyne calls the Voyager mission the hallmark of a “Third Great Age of Discovery,” similar to ambitious seagoing expeditions in the 16th and 18th centuries. As with those earlier journeys, Voyager was motivated by a mix of desires: military, political, economic, and a love of pure discovery. By narrating both the Voyager s and past voyages—such as Henry the Navigator’s—Pyne captures the Western passion for exploration and the lure of the unknown, while relating the fascinating story of two fragile spacecraft continuing after three decades their brave quest across space and time. Illus. (July 26) --Staff (Reviewed May 3, 2010) (Publishers Weekly, vol 257, issue 18, p39)
  • /* Starred Review */ An environmental historian blends the past, present and future of exploration in a unique account of the Voyager space program.Pyne (Life Sciences/Arizona State Univ.; Voice and Vision: A Guide to Writing History and Other Serious Nonfiction, 2009, etc.) sets for himself a difficult task—vivifying for the general reader the 30-year journey of an unmanned spacecraft. After all, our interest in exploration is often inextricable from our fascination with the explorers themselves. The author ingeniously overcomes this built-in narrative disadvantage, where the technology itself is the exploring agent, by placing the Voyager mission—two spacecraft designed to visit the outer planets of our solar system and beyond—squarely within the context of several hundred years of exploration. The International Geophysical Year of 1957–58, a project designed to take the scientific temperature of the Earth, oceans and space, kicked off the Third Great Age of Discovery, which arose from quickened national rivalries inspiring an unusual period of expansion. Previous Ages of Discovery featured all manner of extraordinary achievements, and each culminated in a Grand Tour—e.g., Magellan's circumnavigation of the globe, von Humboldt's Latin American expedition—that perfectly captured the era's ambition. For our own Age, Voyager is that venture, a crowning gesture of remarkable cultural consequence. Pyne reports fully on the program's genesis and evolution, Voyager's discoveries and its signal encounters with the asteroid belt, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and interstellar space. The author's acuity and interpretive skill come most impressively to bear when he regularly suspends the narrative, "cruising" he calls it, to draw striking connections between Voyager's journey and expeditions of the past. The many parallels—political, technological, social, economic, military, scientific, even spiritual—fix Voyager's place in the constellation of discovery, even as Pyne distinguishes the mission and our age from its ancestors.A challenging but immensely rewarding read. (Kirkus Reviews, May 15, 2010)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
349981
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1949-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Pyne, Stephen J.
Dewey number
523
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • plates
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Voyager Project
  • Planets
  • Aeronautics
  • Astronautics
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
seeking newer worlds in the third great age of discovery
Label
Voyager : seeking newer worlds in the third great age of discovery, Stephen J. Pyne
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [419]-425) and index
Control code
000044982017
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xix, 444 p., [8] p. of plates
Isbn
9780670021833
Other physical details
ill.
Label
Voyager : seeking newer worlds in the third great age of discovery, Stephen J. Pyne
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [419]-425) and index
Control code
000044982017
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xix, 444 p., [8] p. of plates
Isbn
9780670021833
Other physical details
ill.

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