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The Resource The telescope in the ice : inventing a new astronomy at the South Pole, Mark Bowen

The telescope in the ice : inventing a new astronomy at the South Pole, Mark Bowen

Label
The telescope in the ice : inventing a new astronomy at the South Pole
Title
The telescope in the ice
Title remainder
inventing a new astronomy at the South Pole
Statement of responsibility
Mark Bowen
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The IceCube Observatory has been called the "weirdest" of the seven wonders of modern astronomy by Scientific American. In The Telescope in the Ice, Mark Bowen tells the amazing story of the people who built the instrument and the science involved. Located near the U. S. Amundsen-Scott Research Station at the geographic South Pole, IceCube is unlike most telescopes in that it is not designed to detect light. It employs a cubic kilometre of diamond-clear ice, more than a mile beneath the surface, to detect an elementary particle known as the neutrino. In 2010, it detected the first extraterrestrial high-energy neutrinos and thus gave birth to a new field of astronomy. IceCube is also the largest particle physics detector ever built. Its scientific goals span not only astrophysics and cosmology but also pure particle physics. And since the neutrino is one of the strangest and least understood of the known elementary particles, this is fertile ground. Neutrino physics is perhaps the most active field in particle physics today, and IceCube is at the forefront. The Telescope in the Ice is, ultimately, a book about people and the thrill of the chase: the struggle to understand the neutrino and the pioneers and inventors of neutrino astronomy
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Bowen, a physicist and writer, immerses readers deep in Antarctic ice as he offers a mesmerizing look at a development in cutting-edge astrophysics with which few people are familiar: the South Pole’s IceCube Neutrino Observatory, the “weirdest” telescope in the world. Instead of gathering data from starlight, IceCube searches for neutrinos—electrically neutral, nearly massless particles that have fascinated and frustrated physicists since they were first proposed by Wolfgang Pauli in the 1930s. As Bowen explains, astrophysicists are interested in neutrinos because they come from places that regular telescopes never see: stellar interiors, supernovae, and the supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies. Bowen describes how IceCube hunts neutrinos with sensitive detectors sunk more than a mile deep in Antarctic ice. The detectors look “down” through the Earth, using it as a shield to block cosmic rays and in turn make evidence of neutrinos easier to identify in the ice. Bowen relates the story of IceCube with wry humor and enthusiasm, bringing to life the researchers, their rivalries, and their challenges, as well as the science. Infusing groundbreaking inquiry with the spirit of those who carry it out, Bowen delivers a tale that’s part educational, part inspirational, and all adventure. (Nov.) --Staff (Reviewed 09/11/2017) (Publishers Weekly, vol 264, issue 37, p)
  • Bowen's (Thin Ice) marvelous tale of the development of a new kind of telescope that detects neutrinos, or subatomic particles that rarely interact with matter they pass through, tells how physicist Francis Halzen designed a telescope that pointed toward space, removing any false positive findings. Also discussed is AMANDA (Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array), a series of light detectors buried within a mile of ice at the geographic South Pole at IceCube Neutrino Observatory. As neutrinos pass through the Earth, they sometimes interact with the ice and create a charged particle that emits blue light. By tracking this light, observers can locate the neutrino and verify its existence. This book begins with an introduction of how AMANDA operates and the main players involved. Bowen then jumps back 20 years to the initial meetings for the development of AMANDA, the engineering it took to build, and the trials and failures of the entire project. VERDICT Concluding with a helpful list of acronyms, this useful reference work belongs in any physics and astronomy collection.—Jason L. Steagall, Gateway Technical Coll. Lib., Elkhorn, WI --Jason L. Steagall (Reviewed 10/15/2017) (Library Journal, vol 142, issue 17, p99)
  • An account of a telescope that "is unlike any other telescope you've ever seen or heard of, a marvel of science "buried more than a mile deep in the ice at the geographic South Pole."<br><br>Occupying a cubic kilometer under the ice at the South Pole is a huge instrument dubbed one of the "seven wonders of modern astronomy." It doesn't search for light like a telescope but rather ghostly subatomic particles called neutrinos that fill the universe. In this enthusiastic account of Project IceCube, physicist Bowen (<i>Censoring Science: Inside the Political Attack on Dr. James Hansen and the Truth of Global Warming</i>, 2007, etc.) explains that nuclear reactions produce neutrinos. They gush from stars, the sun, and earthly reactors and accelerators. Billions pass harmlessly through your fingertip every second, often after passing through the Earth or across the universe. Almost nothing stops a neutrino, but the key word is "almost." An immense device operated by patient observers will occasionally detect one. All require massive shielding to keep out the far more common cosmic rays. After describing competing projects, many still in operation thousands of feet underground or deep under water, Bowen gets down to business with a hair-raising account of 20 years of misery at the South Pole as a team of physicists and engineers suffered, repeatedly failed, and eventually succeeded in drilling 60 holes a mile deep, lowering complex electronics, and letting the ice freeze around them. The instrument works; since Project IceCube's completion in 2010, a few dozen distant neutrinos have made themselves known. Bowen works hard to explain their role in the quantum mechanical world. This requires mentioning other arcane subatomic particles, but, like many popular science writers, the author spends more time delivering lively journalistic accounts of the colorful scientists involved.<br><br>Readers who have forgotten college physics may not understand much about neutrinos, but they will enjoy reading about those who do.(Kirkus Reviews, October 1, 2017)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10603428
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Bowen, Mark
Dewey number
522.686
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • IceCube South Pole Neutrino Observatory
  • Neutrinos
  • Neutrino astrophysics
  • Astronomy
  • Astronomical observatories
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
inventing a new astronomy at the South Pole
Label
The telescope in the ice : inventing a new astronomy at the South Pole, Mark Bowen
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 401-415) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Machine generated contents note: pt. I The Birth and Youth of the Neutrino -- 1.This Crazy Child -- 2.Infancy and Youth -- 3.From Poltergeist to Particle -- pt. II The Dream of Neutrino Astronomy -- 4.Wisconsin-Style Physics -- 5.Peaceful Exploration by Interested Scientists Throughout the World -- 6.Science at Its Best -- pt. III Touching the Mystery -- 7.Solid-State DUMAND -- 8.Enter Bruce -- 9.The Crossover -- 10.A Supernova of Science -- 11.Doubling Down -- 12.Glory Days -- 13.Night on the Ice -- 14.The First Nus -- 15.The Peacock and Eva Events -- 16.Y2K at Pole -- pt. IV The Real Thing -- 17.Sometimes You Get What You Ask For -- 18.No New Starts -- 19.The Coming of Yeck -- 20.Failure and Success -- 21.As Quickly as It All Began -- 22.Crossing the Threshold
Control code
000060213361
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
First edition.
Extent
viii, 424 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781137280084
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2017026874
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
YBP13310150
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)990248441
Label
The telescope in the ice : inventing a new astronomy at the South Pole, Mark Bowen
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 401-415) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Machine generated contents note: pt. I The Birth and Youth of the Neutrino -- 1.This Crazy Child -- 2.Infancy and Youth -- 3.From Poltergeist to Particle -- pt. II The Dream of Neutrino Astronomy -- 4.Wisconsin-Style Physics -- 5.Peaceful Exploration by Interested Scientists Throughout the World -- 6.Science at Its Best -- pt. III Touching the Mystery -- 7.Solid-State DUMAND -- 8.Enter Bruce -- 9.The Crossover -- 10.A Supernova of Science -- 11.Doubling Down -- 12.Glory Days -- 13.Night on the Ice -- 14.The First Nus -- 15.The Peacock and Eva Events -- 16.Y2K at Pole -- pt. IV The Real Thing -- 17.Sometimes You Get What You Ask For -- 18.No New Starts -- 19.The Coming of Yeck -- 20.Failure and Success -- 21.As Quickly as It All Began -- 22.Crossing the Threshold
Control code
000060213361
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
First edition.
Extent
viii, 424 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9781137280084
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2017026874
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
YBP13310150
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)990248441

Library Locations

    • Lionel Bowen Library and Community CentreBorrow it
      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
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