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The Resource The princess of Burundi, Kjell Eriksson ; translated from the Swedish by Ebba Segerberg

The princess of Burundi, Kjell Eriksson ; translated from the Swedish by Ebba Segerberg

Label
The princess of Burundi
Title
The princess of Burundi
Statement of responsibility
Kjell Eriksson ; translated from the Swedish by Ebba Segerberg
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
  • eng
  • swe
  • eng
Member of
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • The success of Henning Mankell in the U.S. has started a mini-avalanche of Swedish crime fiction in this country. Whereas Mankell builds his series around one hero, a world-weary cop forced to confront the racism of a new multicultural Sweden, Eriksson takes his cue from Ed McBain, portraying a group of investigators very much in the 87th Precinct vein (a minor character here chastises one of the detectives with the remark, Youre no Carella, alluding to McBains top cop.) The action revolves around the murder of an unemployed welder in the small town of Uppsala, a man universally liked and admired for his avoidance of the criminal underworld that has snared his brother. Eriksson jumps between the various detectives investigating the murder and the family of the victim, agonizing over the seemingly motiveless crime. With Christmas approaching, an unshakable melancholy descends on cops and criminals alike, as Eriksson evokes the gap between peoples dreams and the potential to get off track. Solid procedural plotting overlaid with a sensitive rendering of inner lives and emotions held in check beyond the breaking point. -- Bill Ott (Reviewed 01-01-2006) (Booklist, vol 102, number 9, p66)
  • Adult/High School –An ordinary crime novel is made extraordinary through Eriksson’s exquisite character descriptions and circuitous plot. Former small-time crook Little John Jonsson is found brutally murdered, with clear evidence of torture. The Uppsala police force investigates and eventually identifies the killer. The author skillfully constructs the personality of each character, revealing, for example, the weaknesses inherent in policeman Ola Haver and Ann Liddell versus the hidden strengths of the victim’s brother, Lennart Jonsson, and son, Justus. Haver leads the investigation while managing a strained relationship with his wife and an attraction to his former boss, Liddell. Lennart Jonsson’s guilt and grief over his brother’s death eventually destroys him, but not before he exacts his revenge (albeit unrecognized) and becomes a hero. Justus had a secret pact with his father that may have saved Little John’s life had he shared it with his mother or the police. The likely suspect is a demented, pathetic person who knew his victim as one of his tormentors in school–a period that haunts him in his adult life. The entangled relationships among the police, the victim, and the victim’s family are compelling. Teens will be drawn to deconstruct the intelligent puzzle created by Eriksson, right down to the book’s title.–Claudia C. Holland, Chantilly Regional Library, Fairfax County, VA --Claudia C. Holland (Reviewed May 1, 2006) (School Library Journal, vol 52, issue 5, p165)
  • /* Starred Review */ When the badly mutilated body of John Harald Jonsson—a working-class family man and an expert on the tropical fish known as cichlids—is found in the snow in the provincial Swedish town of Libro, homicide detective Ola Haver and his colleague, Ann Lindell, quickly identify a suspect, an embittered sociopath. The brilliance of Eriksson's richly detailed crime novel, his second (after The Illuminated Path ) but his first to be translated into English, lies in its psychological and even sociological insights. Eriksson not only reveals a deep, sympathetic understanding for his large cast of characters but also evokes a pervasive sense of despair, reminiscent of Henning Mankell's, in the face of the violent, amoral nature of contemporary society and the challenges it places on the police. The title derives from the common name of one of Jonsson's beloved cichlids, and the aquarium is a neat metaphor for the dynamics of smalltown life. This suspenseful, intelligent and perceptive book is terrific. (Feb.) --Staff (Reviewed November 28, 2005) (Publishers Weekly, vol 252, issue 47, p26)
  • /* Starred Review */ Could Eriksson become Sweden's Ed McBain? This solid police procedural, winner of the Swedish Crime Academy Award for Best Crime Novel, is reminiscent of the “87th Precinct” series, with its emphasis on the work and lives of the cops. When the tortured and mutilated body of tropical fish fancier John Jonsson is found, Uppsala police resist tying the murder to other cases committed by Jonsson's mentally unbalanced school classmate and instead seek a money motive. (The novel's title is the popular name for a particular tropical fish, as well as John's pet name for his wife, Berit.) Not as dark as recent mysteries by fellow Scandinavian mystery writers Åke Edwardson (Sun and Shadow ) and Arnaldur Indridason (Jar City ), this has its own tone, with strong echoes of McBain in characters, plot, and prose. Don't miss it. [See Prepub Mystery, LJ 10/1/05.] --Michele Leber (Reviewed December 15, 2005) (Library Journal, vol 130, issue 20, p103)
  • The murder of a young father baffles police and upsets many in the sleepy town where he lived.A jogger in Uppsala, Sweden, discovers the mutilated body of John Jonsson during a December run. "Little John" had been reported missing by his wife Berit. A construction worker and family man who shares with his son Justus an intense interest in tropical fish, like the eponymous Princess, John has a checkered past, including many arrests for petty crimes with his older brother Lennart. Ola Haver and his detective team follow up on the most promising lead, a high-stakes card game John played shortly before his disappearance. Though on maternity leave, detective Ann Lindell becomes obsessed with the case, calling Ola to compare notes, much to the consternation of his wife Rebecka, who understands their mutual attraction better than they do. Meanwhile, schoolteacher Gunilla Karlsson has reported the murder of one of her cats, a crime ignored by the police until cat-killer Vincent Hahn, who lives in squalor and sleeps with a mannequin, shows up at her door.Subtle characters and precise prose will keep readers interested until the surprising solution. Erikkson (The Illuminated Path, 1999, not reviewed, etc.) won the award for Best Swedish Crime Novel, and deservedly so. (Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2005)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
138968
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1953-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Eriksson, Kjell
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Segerberg, Ebba
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Ann Lindell novels
Series volume
0001
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Murder investigation
  • Women detectives
  • Revenge
  • Policewomen
  • Police
  • New mothers
  • Maternity leave
  • Murder
  • Small town life
  • Lindell, Ann (Fictitious character)
  • Sweden
Label
The princess of Burundi, Kjell Eriksson ; translated from the Swedish by Ebba Segerberg
Instantiates
Publication
Control code
000027598239
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
300 p.
Isbn
9780312327675
Label
The princess of Burundi, Kjell Eriksson ; translated from the Swedish by Ebba Segerberg
Publication
Control code
000027598239
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
300 p.
Isbn
9780312327675

Library Locations

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      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
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