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The Resource The little girl who fought the Great Depression : Shirley Temple and 1930s America, John F. Kasson

The little girl who fought the Great Depression : Shirley Temple and 1930s America, John F. Kasson

Label
The little girl who fought the Great Depression : Shirley Temple and 1930s America
Title
The little girl who fought the Great Depression
Title remainder
Shirley Temple and 1930s America
Statement of responsibility
John F. Kasson
Title variation
Shirley Temple and 1930s America
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • As historian Kasson eloquently points out in this often repetitive but useful survey of Temple’s role in Depression America, the young star entertained America at one of its lowest points, winning the hearts of a nation and giving hope to a hopeless society. “In all her 1930s movies beginning with Stand Up and Cheer! , Shirley Temple helped viewers summon the emotional resources to persevere in the world.” Kasson confines his deft critical writing to the 1930s, the height of Temple’s popularity, chronicling her rise to fame, her lasting impact on the movies and society, and her view of herself as a professional actor and not a child laborer. At the height of her popularity, he observes, “Shirley Temple’s films, products, and endorsements stimulated the American consumer economy at a crucial time, so much so that to some she appeared to be a relief program all by herself.” Kasson’s insightful book looks back to a moment in American society when, he argues, the movies mattered and when one magnetic star could help change people’s minds and hearts. (May) --Staff (Reviewed March 31, 2014) (Publishers Weekly, vol 261, issue 13, p)
  • Readers who are expecting a juicy biography of recently deceased child star Shirley Temple (1928–2014) will be disappointed in this analysis of the cultural effects of her movies on a despairing America during the Great Depression. Kasson (history & American studies, Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill), though he gives the basics of both Temple's and her parents' lives, is more focused on the actress's film persona and how it served to raise the spirits of a somber nation. Almost a third of the book focuses on Temple's smile and happy face as a metaphor for the optimism that occurred when Franklin D. Roosevelt (also a smiler) took office after President Herbert Hoover, who was perceived as aloof and insular. Kasson also touches on the movie studios' exploitation of child actors (Temple worked practically every day of her young life) and the racial boundaries that were broken when she performed with the African American tap dancer and actor Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. VERDICT With Temple's passing in February of this year at age 86, this book is a timely and well-researched addition to the genre, and one that film students will welcome. However, those seeking more personal information about the performer's life should look for Temple's 1988 autobiography, Child Star. — Rosellen Brewer, Sno-Isle Libs., Marysville, WA --Rosellen Brewer (Reviewed April 1, 2014) (Library Journal, vol 139, issue 6, p93)
  • A cultural historian examines how the films of Shirley Temple (1928–2014) worked in tandem with New Deal politics to help Americans overcome the Great Depression. The images most associated with the 1930s bear witness to the hardships average Americans faced. But the ones most popular during this time bore the radiant face of child actress Temple. In this study, Kasson (History and American Studies/Univ. of North Carolina; Houdini, Tarzan, and the Perfect Man: The White Male Body and the Challenge of Modernity in America, 2001, etc.) argues that Temple's smile and sunny personality helped bring Franklin Roosevelt's "politics of cheer" to the forefront of national consciousness while providing Americans with much-needed emotional solace. Roosevelt's New Deal legislation, which made government assistance available to "the forgotten man at the bottom of the economic pyramid," only went so far. Consumer confidence, which implied faith in the future, also had to be restored to ensure the return of prosperity. Roosevelt accomplished part of this task through the vigorously cheerful outlook he projected in his political addresses. From 1934 to 1940, Temple captivated movie-going audiences all over the United States and the world with her ability to heal broken hearts with her "inexhaustible fund of optimism." Through her extraordinary dance partnership with black entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Temple also called attention to the problem of race in both Hollywood and the United States while bringing hope to African-Americans, who had suffered even more than whites during the Depression. The cult of personality that developed around Temple even helped the struggling economy. At the height of the young star's popularity, fans spent millions of dollars on Temple memorabilia. Informative and well-researched, Kasson's work offers insight into one of Hollywood's most beloved entertainers, as well as the fascinating connection between politics and entertainment.(Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 2014)
Biography type
individual biography
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10304626
Cataloging source
StDuBDS
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1944-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kasson, John F.
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Temple, Shirley
  • Motion picture actors and actresses
  • Popular culture
  • Depressions
  • United States
  • United States
  • United States
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
Shirley Temple and 1930s America
Label
The little girl who fought the Great Depression : Shirley Temple and 1930s America, John F. Kasson
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Contents
Contents note: 1.Smile Like Roosevelt -- 2.Such a Happy Little Face! -- 3.Dancing Along the Color Line -- 4.The Most Adored Child in the World -- 5.Keeping Shirley's Star Aloft -- 6.What's a Private Life?
Control code
000052439368
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
First Edition.
Extent
308 pages
Isbn
9780393240795
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2013049983
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)869365388
Label
The little girl who fought the Great Depression : Shirley Temple and 1930s America, John F. Kasson
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Contents
Contents note: 1.Smile Like Roosevelt -- 2.Such a Happy Little Face! -- 3.Dancing Along the Color Line -- 4.The Most Adored Child in the World -- 5.Keeping Shirley's Star Aloft -- 6.What's a Private Life?
Control code
000052439368
Dimensions
25 cm.
Edition
First Edition.
Extent
308 pages
Isbn
9780393240795
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Lccn
2013049983
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)869365388

Library Locations

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