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The Resource The fairy tales of Hermann Hesse, translated and with an introduction by Jack Zipes ; woodcut illustrations by David Frampton

The fairy tales of Hermann Hesse, translated and with an introduction by Jack Zipes ; woodcut illustrations by David Frampton

Label
The fairy tales of Hermann Hesse
Title
The fairy tales of Hermann Hesse
Statement of responsibility
translated and with an introduction by Jack Zipes ; woodcut illustrations by David Frampton
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • ger
  • eng
Member of
Tone
Review
  • Fairy tales fascinated Hesse. Translator Zipes analyzes this attraction and places it within the context of Hesse's emotionally turbulent life in his illuminating introduction. Zipes also describes the progression of Hesse's aesthetics from his early self-absorption and belief in the artist as hero to a more worldly perspective embracing social and political issues and emphasizing the artist's role as witness and critic. This outlook greatly elevated his writing, an evolution evident in this remarkable collection, the first published English translation of Hesse's fairy tales. Written between 1900 and 1933, Hesse's lucid, captivating, and unusual interpretations of the genre often feature heroes in search of self-knowledge and inner peace. Old-fashioned tales such as "The Dwarf" (1904) give way to such modern fables as "The City" (1910) and "The European" (1918). As Zipes astutely points out, the ogres and obstacles in Hesse's tales are what he considered to be the banes of modern existence: "science, materialism, war, alienation, and philistinism." A boon for Hesse fans, this is an important addition to Hesse's ever-popular English-language oeuvre. ((Reviewed Oct. 1, 1995)) -- Donna Seaman
  • Merging Eastern mysticism with the motifs of the European fairy tale, the stories translated for this volume, many for the first time, offer insight into Hesse's development as an artist during the first two decades of this century. Sometimes lush and lyrical, sometimes in the simple language of the parable, these tales elaborate Hesse's concerns with mortality, the unity of life and the isolation of the artist. Characters renounce human society to become poets, vegetarians or, as in the fantastic story "Faldum," a mountain. The artist as ascetic, observer and loner, misunderstood by his audience, is a recurring theme. Several of the stories reflect Hesse's pacifist stance during WWI, covering great spans of time to drive home the devastation of war and transience of civilization. Whether evoking the rise and fall of a nation or an individual, Hesse is preoccupied with the need for both to rediscover their "undestroyed essence" and begin anew. A refreshing lack of narrative closure distinguishes Hesse's tales, which mitigates an irritating tendency to equate self-knowledge with the return home to an eternal, spiritual mother. Quirky and evocative, Hesse's fairy tales stand alone, but also amplify the ideas and utopian longings of such counterculture avatars as Siddhartha and Steppenwolf. (Nov.)
  • Hesse unerringly creates the feel of a fairy tale in the first paragraph of all these works but then proceeds to alter their development in an unmistakably 20th-century way. The title character of "Augustus," for example, loses everything and passes through a series of tribulations, like the traditional fairy-tale hero, but attains happiness without regaining his fortune, looks, health, or the love and affection of his friends. Slightly more than half these tales were written during World War I and consequently deal with the great themes of war and peace, life, suffering, and death. Particularly poignant is "A Dream of the Gods," which depicts the enthusiasm that greeted the outbreak of war while subtly exposing its folly. Lay readers will enjoy this as much as literary specialists.--Michael T. O'Pecko, Towson State Univ., Md.
  • Some pleasant surprises are displayed--along with some dreary redundancies--in this nevertheless welcome first English translation of the German writer's fables and parables. Hesse (1877--1962) was, of course, the Nobel Prize--winning author of such complex and intellectually challenging novels as Steppenwolf (1927) and Magister Ludi (1943). But many readers prize him most as a Western interpreter of Eastern wisdom, especially as transmitted in such equally famous "fictions" (discursive as they are) as Siddhartha (1922) and The Journey to the East (1956). Even Wordsworth fainting at the sheepfold seems robust compared with the lachrymose romanticism of Hesse's little prose sermons on the fragility of the artist's temperament ("The Poet," "Flute Dream"), the evils of progress and technology ("The City"), or the superiority of pacifist introversion ("The European," "The Empire"). Too many of these stories trail off into inconclusiveness, and there's a fulsome excess of sentences like "The mountain lived on silently in his greatness." That said, there's also much to admire in this superbly edited and vigorously translated gathering of 22 such tales, all written and published between 1904 and 1918. "Augustus" and "Iris" are interesting complementary explorations of the ironies of mingled romantic failure and artistic success. "The Dwarf" contrives a Poe-like story of revenge in a solidly realized Italian Renaissance setting. "The Forest Dweller" radiates some of the confident animism, and also the vivid specificity, of Kipling's best tales in this vein. And "A Man by the Name of Ziegler" is magically gifted with understanding the language of animals--only to discover these "noble" creatures are no better than their human counterparts. Unfortunately, the later pieces are weaker, so the volume ends with a distinct whimper. No matter: Zipes's English versions, which lucidly convey both Hesse's vapid generalizations and his athletic lyricism, often manage to show this very uneven writer to best advantage. Minor work from a more-or-less major writer, and a lot more fun than much of Hesse's major fiction. (Kirkus Reviews, September 15, 1995)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
161740
Cataloging source
TOC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1877-1962
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hesse, Hermann
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Zipes, Jack David
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Fairy tales
Label
The fairy tales of Hermann Hesse, translated and with an introduction by Jack Zipes ; woodcut illustrations by David Frampton
Instantiates
Publication
Contents
Hermann Hesse's Fairy Tales and the Pursuit of Home /Jack Zipes -- The Dwarf (1904) -- Shadow Play (1906) --A Man by the Name of Ziegler (1908) -- The City (1910) -- Dr. Knoegle's End (1910) -- The Beautiful Dream (1912) -- The Three Linden Trees (1912) --Augustus (1913) -- The Poet (1913) -- Flute Dream (1914) -- A Dream About the Gods (1914) -- Strange News from Another Planet (1915) -- Faldum (1916) -- A Dream Sequence (1916) -- The Forest Dweller (1917) --The Difficult Path (1917) -- If the War Continues (1917) -- The European (1918) -- The Empire (1918) --The Painter (1918) -- The Fairy Tale About the Wicker Chair (1918) -- Iris (1918)
Control code
000011389873
Dimensions
22 cm.
Extent
xxxi, 266 p.
Isbn
9780553377767
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
94049166
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)31900659
Label
The fairy tales of Hermann Hesse, translated and with an introduction by Jack Zipes ; woodcut illustrations by David Frampton
Publication
Contents
Hermann Hesse's Fairy Tales and the Pursuit of Home /Jack Zipes -- The Dwarf (1904) -- Shadow Play (1906) --A Man by the Name of Ziegler (1908) -- The City (1910) -- Dr. Knoegle's End (1910) -- The Beautiful Dream (1912) -- The Three Linden Trees (1912) --Augustus (1913) -- The Poet (1913) -- Flute Dream (1914) -- A Dream About the Gods (1914) -- Strange News from Another Planet (1915) -- Faldum (1916) -- A Dream Sequence (1916) -- The Forest Dweller (1917) --The Difficult Path (1917) -- If the War Continues (1917) -- The European (1918) -- The Empire (1918) --The Painter (1918) -- The Fairy Tale About the Wicker Chair (1918) -- Iris (1918)
Control code
000011389873
Dimensions
22 cm.
Extent
xxxi, 266 p.
Isbn
9780553377767
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
94049166
Other physical details
ill.
System control number
(OCoLC)31900659

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