The Resource The Wych Elm, Tana French

The Wych Elm, Tana French

Label
The Wych Elm
Title
The Wych Elm
Statement of responsibility
Tana French
Title variation
Witch Elm
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"A brilliant new work of suspense from "the most important crime novelist to emerge in the past 10 years." (Washington Post) From the writer who "inspires cultic devotion in readers" (The New Yorker) and has been called "incandescent" by Stephen King, "absolutely mesmerising" by Gillian Flynn, and "unputdownable" (People), comes a gripping new novel that turns a crime story inside out. Toby is a happy-go-lucky charmer who's dodged a scrape at work and is celebrating with friends when the night takes a turn that will change his life - he surprises two burglars who beat him and leave him for dead. Struggling to recover from his injuries, beginning to understand that he might never be the same man again, he takes refuge at his family's ancestral home to care for his dying uncle Hugo. Then a skull is found in the trunk of an elm tree in the garden - and as detectives close in, Toby is forced to face the possibility that his past may not be what he has always believed. A spellbinding standalone from one of the best suspense writers working today, The Wych Elm asks what we become, and what we're capable of, when we no longer know who we are"--
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
  • LibraryReads Favorites, 2018.
  • Library Journal Best Books, 2018.
  • Loan Stars Favourites, 2018.
  • New York Times Notable Book, 2018
Review
  • This standalone novel has all the things readers love about the Dublin Murder Squad books--well developed characters, exquisite plotting, and deep explorations of human nature. Toby leads a charmed life with an idyllic childhood, a good family, a loving girlfriend, and promising prospects. But a vicious attack changes everything. Atmospheric, twisty, and perfect for readers who like Gillian Flynn or Kate Atkinson. -- Laura Bovee, Chicopee Public Library, Chicopee, MA. (LibraryReads, October 2018)
  • The Witch Elm is Tana French’s first standalone, following five Dublin Murder Squad mysteries. It’s as good as the best of those novels, if not better. In theme and atmosphere, it evokes her earliest two books, Into the Woods and The Likeness, using the driving mystery—of course, there’s a murder—as a vehicle for asking complex questions about identity and human nature. But in this latest work, privilege is French’s subject; more specifically, the relationship between privilege and what we perceive as luck. Who might we become if the privileges we take for granted were suddenly ripped away? Instead of a world-weary detective, our narrator is Toby, an easygoing 20-something who has always taken his wild good fortune as a matter of course. He’s attractive, clever, and universally liked. A publicist for a Dublin art gallery, he has a girlfriend so saintly that it takes a while for her to register as a real character (or at least for him to see her that way). Then robbers break into his apartment and beat him so badly that the physical damage permeates every aspect of his life, fundamentally altering his appearance, his gait, and his sense of self. His memory is newly riddled with gaps; his frustration as he attempts to discern what’s real, what’s remembered, and what’s paranoia adds fuel to the plot. While he’s in the hospital, his beloved Uncle Hugo, keeper of the Ivy House, a family property that’s rendered with French’s signature attention to real estate, is diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. Toby moves in with him, both to keep him company and because he, too, needs a caretaker. When a human skull turns up in a hollow of a witch elm in the backyard of the Ivy House, the plot revs its engine. Who does the skull belong to? And what does Toby have to do with whoever died in his backyard, or at least who was buried there? In typical French fashion, just when you think you’ve started to piece it all together, the picture shifts before your eyes. It’s a bold move to wait until nearly a third of the way into the book to deploy the body. But what might seem like throat-clearing in another writer’s novel is taut and tense in The Witch Elm, thanks to a layered network of subplots and the increasing fragmentation of Toby himself. In many ways, the most interesting question the novel asks is not whodunit; it’s whether, and how, Toby will come back together again. Stepping outside the restrictions of the Dublin Murder Squad format suits French. Readers used to the detective’s perspective might miss the shop talk, not to mention the pleasure of inhabiting the POV of the smartest character rather than (in this case) the most bewildered. By channeling the story through a narrator who’s unfamiliar with the very worst parts of human nature, she’s able to put her thematic questions at center stage . She carefully builds Toby up, and then strips every part of him away; the result is a chilling interrogation of privilege and the transformative effects of trauma. Julie Buntin is the author of Marlena, a novel. Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.
  • A stand-alone novel from the author of the Dublin Murder Squad series. French has earned a reputation for atmospheric and existentially troubling police procedurals. Here, the protagonist is a crime victim rather than a detective. Toby Hennessy is a lucky man. He has a job he enjoys at an art gallery. He has a lovely girlfriend named Melissa. And he has a large, supportive family, including his kind Uncle Hugo and two cousins who are more like siblings. As the story begins, Toby's just gotten himself into a bit of a mess at work, but he's certain that he'll be able to smooth things over, because life is easy for him—until two men break into his apartment and brutally beat him. The damage Toby suffers, both physical and mental, undermines his sense of self. His movements are no longer relaxed and confident. His facility with words is gone. And his memory is full of appalling blanks. When he learns that his uncle is dying, Toby decides that he can still be useful by caring for him, so he moves into the Hennessy family's ancestral home, and Melissa goes with him. The three of them form a happy family unit, but their idyll comes to an abrupt end when Toby's cousin's children find a human skull in the trunk of an elm tree at the bottom of the garden. As the police try to solve the mystery posed by this gruesome discovery, Toby begins to question everything he thought he knew about himself and his family. The narrative is fueled by some of the same themes French has explored in the past. It's reminiscent of The Likeness (2008) in the way it challenges the idea of identity as a fixed and certain construct. And the unreliability of memory was a central issue in her first novel, In the Woods (2007). The pace is slow, but the story is compelling, and French is deft in unraveling this book's puzzles. Readers will see some revelations coming long before Toby, but there are some shocking twists, too. Psychologically intense. (Kirkus Reviews, August 1, 2018)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10732621
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
French, Tana
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Victims of crimes
  • Death
  • Family secrets
  • Criminal investigation
  • Brain damage
  • Amnesiacs
  • Ireland
Target audience
adult
Label
The Wych Elm, Tana French
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
000062280952
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
509 pages
Isbn
9780735224629
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2018022167
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1030487587
Label
The Wych Elm, Tana French
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
000062280952
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
509 pages
Isbn
9780735224629
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2018022167
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)1030487587

Library Locations

    • Lionel Bowen Library and Community CentreBorrow it
      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
    • Malabar Community LibraryBorrow it
      1203 Anzac Parade, Matraville, NSW, 2036, AU
      -33.962293 151.245961
    • Margaret Martin LibraryBorrow it
      Level 1, Royal Randwick Shopping Centre, Randwick, NSW, 2031, AU
      -33.9151421 151.2408898
Processing Feedback ...