Coverart for item
The Resource The Prize in the Game

The Prize in the Game

Label
The Prize in the Game
Title
The Prize in the Game
Statement of responsibility
Jo Walton
Creator
Subject
Summary
When a friendly competition leads to the death of a beloved horse and incurs the wrath of the Horse Goddess, the kingdoms of the island of Tir Isarnagiri are doomed to suffer. As the goddess' curse chases them down the years, four friends destined for kingship-Conal, Emer, Darag, and Ferdia-are forced into conflict as their countries build towards war. Matters are complicated when Emer and Conal fall in love, and dream of escaping together from the machinations of their respective families. But Conal and Ferdia are rivals for the High Kingship of the island, and Conal cannot simply leave. The contest between them will lead to a visionary quest on a mountain sacred to the gods-and terrifying to men. Yet Emer faces an even greater struggle. For when war finally comes, Emer has two choices: perform her duty to the homeland to which she owes everything, or protect the one she loves and be branded a traitor forever. The path she takes will become the stuff of legend, and forever alter the destiny of Tir Isarnagiri. Set in the world of Jo Walton's previous novels, The King's Peace and The King's Name, this book takes us to a shining era of dark powers, legendary heroes and passionate loves-all of them ruled by the hand of Fate. Learn more on the author's web site. Listed by Unglue.it
Review
  • In the Ireland of Walton's alternate world, four young peoples' lives are torn apart and their homelands threatened with fratricidal destruction after a goddess is accidentally offended. As Walton develops her alternate Celts, however, what with their convoluted politics and quick tempers, it sometimes seems that the miffed deity is superfluous. The feuds of local potentates are quite capable of generating all the havoc any novel could need to keep readers turning pages. As with previous Walton novels, readers will indeed do just that, especially the intelligent sort of Celtophiles who respect authors with something under their Celts. Moreover, it seems likely that this book will have at least one sequel, for the number of corpses left unavenged by the last page provide all the motivation the rest of the characters need to keep their swords sharp and employed for a good long while. A readable sidebar to Walton's Arthurian variations, The King's Peace (2000) and The King's Name (2001). (Reviewed December 1, 2002) -- Roland Green
  • Rendezvous Review: Emer and Conal fall in love and hope to escape the curse of the evil Horse Goddess and their families. Commitments force Conal to stay on the island of Tir Isarnagiri and fight for what he feels is his right, the High Kingship. Emer is torn between protecting her homeland or the man she loves and be called a traitor. An intricate book with a large cast of characters guaranteed to be intriguing to fantasy readers. Reviewed January 2003 by Sharon Chafin
  • Out of the Celtic twilight, that gold mine of romance lore for contemporary fantasists, comes Walton's retelling of the wooing of Emer, set in the same world as her first two novels, The King's Peace and The King's Name . This story, an expansion of a passage in The King's Peace , follows a group of noble-born youngsters on the cusp of adult warriorhood, their relationships as intertwined as a Celtic knot, in a brawling, bloodthirsty culture where gods stoop to speak with men. Just as one form shifts to another in Celtic art, Walton constantly shifts the point of view as she traces the early careers of beautiful Elenn and Emer, her younger charioteer sister, princesses of Connat being fostered in Oriel for a year; sardonic Conal; the wild dream-ridden Darag; and gentle Ferdia of Lagin, who loves Darag to his own destruction. When a horrible accident causes the death of a warhorse and in revenge the Beastmother goddess Rhiannon curses Oriel, political alliances shatter and reform among these distrustful kingdoms. It seems that Celts, male and female alike, would rather fight than eat. Walton sure-handedly evokes a primitive realm where the Otherworld seamlessly impinges upon reality, bringing sounds, smells, sorrow, hatred and burning love to life as powerfully as the thrust of a barbed spear. She also captures the terrible beauty of a warrior race in an outworn time, struggling, in Yeats's phrase, to come clear of the eternal nets of wrong and right. (Dec. 10) --Staff (Reviewed November 4, 2002) (Publishers Weekly, vol 249, issue 44, p67)
  • Third in the Tir Tanagiri series (The King's Peace, 2000; The King's Name, 2001), set on a mythical island kingdom where Arthurian characters are renamed in Welsh. A fresh set of lead characters shows up here, though materials for this outing are drawn from Chapter 12 of The King's Peace. Previously, the Christian Vincan (Romans) depart Tir Tanagiri, leaving the way open for invasion by the Jarns (Vikings). At last King Urdo (Arthur) drives out the Jarns, though many remain, and visionary Urdo tries to bring peace to the land by uniting all its peoples under the rule of one law, though he is at last defeated on the battlefield by the magic of his evil sister's bastard son Morthu (Modred). But much of all that takes place in the future of the present novel's time scheme. In Ardmachan, young princes Conal, Darag, and Ferdia, along with princess Emer, are destined for royal thrones, but when their countries fall into disarray, the love between Conal, 17, and 16-year-old Emer from Tir Isarnagiri is strained, especially because Emer is supposed to marry Darag, whom she hates. However, Conal's grandfather, the seer Inis, says that while Emer may not marry Darag in one world, she may in another. Maga, the king/queen of Tir Isarnagiri and mother of Emer and her older sister Elenn, is set on war against Ardmachan. For several chapters, Walton shows the warrior youths in training and weaves a cat's-cradle of morganatic marriages in the making. When Conal and Emer fall in love—though they're from rival lands and Emer is promised to another—should they elope? Can love survive the strain of rival homelands at war? Will Emer's love for Conal make her a traitor? Conal, it happens, must also overcome Ferdia for High Kingship.A bitter climax splits the tale wide open for a sequel. Best installment yet. (Kirkus Reviews, November 1, 2002)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
072269
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Jo Walton
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Fantasy fiction
Label
The Prize in the Game
Instantiates
Publication
Control code
ODILO:034300007792
Dimensions
4 3/4 in. or 12 cm.
Form of item
electronic
http://library.link/vocab/inputERC
True
Isbn
9780765302632
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Specific material designation
optical disk
Label
The Prize in the Game
Publication
Control code
ODILO:034300007792
Dimensions
4 3/4 in. or 12 cm.
Form of item
electronic
http://library.link/vocab/inputERC
True
Isbn
9780765302632
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Specific material designation
optical disk

Library Locations

    • Lionel Bowen Library and Community CentreBorrow it
      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
Processing Feedback ...