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The Resource Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right, Arlie Russell Hochschild

Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right, Arlie Russell Hochschild

Label
Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right
Title
Strangers in their own land
Title remainder
anger and mourning on the American right
Statement of responsibility
Arlie Russell Hochschild
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"In Strangers in Their Own Land, the renowned sociologist Arlie Hochschild embarks on a thought-provoking journey from her liberal hometown of Berkeley, California, deep into Louisiana bayou country--a stronghold of the conservative right. As she gets to know people who strongly oppose many of the ideas she famously champions, Hochschild nevertheless finds common ground and quickly warms to the people she meets--among them a Tea Party activist whose town has been swallowed by a sinkhole caused by a drilling accident--people whose concerns are actually ones that all Americans share: the desire for community, the embrace of family, and hopes for their children. Strangers in Their Own Land goes beyond the commonplace liberal idea that these are people who have been duped into voting against their own interests. Instead, Hochschild finds lives ripped apart by stagnant wages, a loss of home, an elusive American dream--and political choices and views that make sense in the context of their lives. Hochschild draws on her expert knowledge of the sociology of emotion to help us understand what it feels like to live in "red" America. Along the way she finds answers to one of the crucial questions of contemporary American politics: why do the people who would seem to benefit most from "liberal" government intervention abhor the very idea?"--
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Hochschild (The Outsourced Self), a sociologist and UC–Berkeley professor emerita, brings her expertise to American politics, addressing today’s conservative movement and the ever-widening gap between right and left. Hochschild contends that current thinking neglects the importance of emotion in politics. Though touching lightly on objective causes, she goes searching primarily for what she names the “deep story”—emotional truth. She focuses on a single group (the Tea Party), state (Louisiana), and issue (environmental pollution), opening her mind—and, crucially, her heart—to the way avowed conservatives tell their stories. Her deeply humble approach is refreshing and strengthens her research. Hochschild discovers attitudes and behaviors around key concepts such as work, honor, religion, welfare, and the environment that may surprise those with left-leaning politics. She intrigues, for example, by showing that what the left regards as prejudice, the right sees as release from imposed “feeling rules,” and the “sympathy fatigue” that results. She skillfully invites liberal readers into the lives of Americans whose views they may have never seriously considered. After evaluating her conclusions and meeting her informants in these pages, it’s hard to disagree that empathy is the best solution to stymied political and social discourse. Agent: Georges Borchardt, Georges Borchardt Inc. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed 06/27/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 26, p)
  • An acclaimed liberal sociologist examines "the increasingly hostile split" between America's two major political parties and "how life feels to people on the right—that is…the emotion that underlies politics."Five years before Donald Trump's presidential bid caught fire, Hochschild (So How's the Family?: And Other Essays, 2013, etc.) decided she wanted to better understand the political and cultural divides in the United States by immersing herself in the anti-government tea party culture so foreign to her own beliefs. Traveling regularly from her Berkeley, California, home to Lake Charles, Louisiana, the author arranged to spend large amounts of time with tea party members and additional self-identified conservatives to figure out how they came to their beliefs. Hochschild felt especially puzzled by the paradox of Louisiana residents residing in dangerously polluted areas yet opposing environmental regulations proposed by both the state and federal governments. Though upset by seemingly racist, sexist, ageist, and economic class hatreds among the men and women she came to know, Hochschild says her determination to observe empathetically rarely flagged. She quickly realized that many of the stated views held of the tea party members were often not fact-based but rather grounded in what life feels like to them—e.g., government feels intrusive, liberals feel condescending, members of racial and ethnic minorities feel lazy and threatening. Trying to imagine herself as the Lake Charles residents viewed themselves, Hochschild vowed to immerse herself thoroughly enough to comprehend what she terms their "deep stories," and she felt grateful that the tea party members who found her views offensive nonetheless shared their time and thoughts generously. At times, Hochschild flirts with overgeneralizing and stereotyping, but for the most part, she conducts herself as a personable, nonjudgmental researcher. A well-told chronicle of an ambitious sociological project of significant current importance.(Kirkus Reviews, June 15, 2016)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10528324
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1940-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hochschild, Arlie Russell
Dewey number
320.973
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Conservatism
  • Liberalism
  • Political psychology
  • Conservatism
  • Liberalism
  • Right and left (Political science)
  • Ideology
  • Political sociology
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
anger and mourning on the American Right
Label
Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right, Arlie Russell Hochschild
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"A journey to the heart of our political divide" -- front cover
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 317-338) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
000058051186
Extent
xii, 351 pages
Isbn
9781620972250
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2016017892
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
40026450191
Other physical details
illustration ; 25 cm.
System control number
(OCoLC)936533936
Label
Strangers in their own land : anger and mourning on the American right, Arlie Russell Hochschild
Publication
Note
"A journey to the heart of our political divide" -- front cover
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 317-338) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
000058051186
Extent
xii, 351 pages
Isbn
9781620972250
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2016017892
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
40026450191
Other physical details
illustration ; 25 cm.
System control number
(OCoLC)936533936

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