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The Resource Ordinary grace : a novel, by William Kent Krueger

Ordinary grace : a novel, by William Kent Krueger

Label
Ordinary grace : a novel
Title
Ordinary grace
Title remainder
a novel
Statement of responsibility
by William Kent Krueger
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Award
  • Anthony Award for Best Novel, 2014.
  • Dilys Award, 2014.
  • Edgar Allan Poe Award for Best Novel, 2014.
  • Macavity Award for Best Mystery Novel, 2014.
  • School Library Journal Best Books: Best Adult Books 4 Teens, 2013
Review
  • Krueger, the author of the best-selling Cork O’Connor mysteries, largely set in Minnesota, has written a stand-alone novel that is part mystery but mostly an extended (and often overly extended) meditation. The narrator, Frank Drum, writes as a middle-age man looking back on a summer in 1961 in New Bremen, Minnesota, when he was 13; the Minnesota Twins were in their first season; and death, in five different instances, shook his family and their community in the Minnesota River valley. The first death is that of Frank’s sometime friend Bobby Cole. The proximate cause was a train, but the mystery is whether Bobby stood in front of that train, or was pushed or placed there. More deaths follow, one of which rips apart Frank’s family. This coming-of-age story is obviously an attempt to show how grace can work through the fissures of suffering. While the setting is well rendered, the characters are too flat, and Krueger keeps striking the same monologist’s meditative note throughout, while most readers will long for variety in style. -- Fletcher, Connie (Reviewed 02-01-2013) (Booklist, vol 109, number 11, p29)
  • Best known for the Cork O’Connor mystery series, Krueger (Trickster’s Point) has produced an elegiac, evocative, stand-alone novel. The summer of 1961 finds thirteen-year-old Frank Drum living in small-town New Bremen, Minn. He and his younger brother, Jake, idolize their older sister, Ariel, a talented church organist who’s also the “golden child” of their parents, WWII veteran and Methodist pastor Nathan and church music director Ruth. Nathan and Ruth befriend the accomplished musician Emil Brandt, a veteran left blinded by his service, who tutors Ariel in her music education. Meanwhile, Jake, who has a stutter, forms a close bond with Lise, Emil’s deaf older sister and caretaker, while Ariel dates Emil’s wealthy nephew, Karl. The Drums’ peaceful existence is shattered, however, when Ariel fails to return from a late-night party. In the aftermath of her disappearance, Karl comes under suspicion, Ruth undergoes a crisis of faith, and dark secrets about New Bremen come to light. The small-town milieu is rendered in picturesque detail, accurate down to period-appropriate TV programs, for what becomes a resonant tale of fury, guilt, and redemption. Agent: Danielle Egan-Miller, Browne & Miller Literary Associates. (Mar.) --Staff (Reviewed January 21, 2013) (Publishers Weekly, vol 260, issue 03, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ A respected mystery writer turns his attention to the biggest mystery of all: God. An award-winning author for his long-running Cork O' Connor series (Trickster's Point, 2012, etc.), Krueger aims higher and hits harder with a stand-alone novel that shares much with his other work. The setting is still his native Minnesota, the tension with the region's Indian population remains palpable and the novel begins with the discovery of a corpse, that of a young boy who was considered a little slow and whose body was found near the train trestle in the woods on the outskirts of town. Was it an accident or something even more sinister? Yet, that opening fatality is something of a red herring (and that initial mystery is never really resolved), as it serves as a prelude to a series of other deaths that shake the world of Frank Drum, the 13-year-old narrator (occasionally from the perspective of his memory of these events, four decades later), his stuttering younger brother and his parents, whose marriage may well not survive these tragedies. One of the novel's pivotal mysteries concerns the gaps among what Frank experiences (as a participant and an eavesdropper), what he knows and what he thinks he knows. "In a small town, nothing is private," he realizes. "Word spreads with the incomprehensibility of magic and the speed of plague." Frank's father, Nathan, is the town's pastor, an aspiring lawyer until his military experience in World War II left him shaken and led him to his vocation. His spouse chafes at the role of minister's wife and doesn't share his faith, though "the awful grace of God," as it manifests itself within the novel, would try the faith of the most devout believer. Yet, ultimately, the world of this novel is one of redemptive grace and mercy, as well as unidentified corpses and unexplainable tragedy. A novel that transforms narrator and reader alike.(Kirkus Reviews, January 1, 2013)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10169544
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Krueger, William Kent
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Families
  • Murder
  • Grief
Label
Ordinary grace : a novel, by William Kent Krueger
Instantiates
Publication
Control code
000050025468
Edition
1st Atria Books hardcover ed.
Extent
307 p. 24 cm.
Isbn
9781451645828
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Label
Ordinary grace : a novel, by William Kent Krueger
Publication
Control code
000050025468
Edition
1st Atria Books hardcover ed.
Extent
307 p. 24 cm.
Isbn
9781451645828
Isbn Type
(hardcover)

Library Locations

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      -33.938111 151.237977
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      Level 1, Royal Randwick Shopping Centre, Randwick, NSW, 2031, AU
      -33.9151421 151.2408898
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