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The Resource October : the story of the Russian Revolution, China Miéville

October : the story of the Russian Revolution, China Miéville

Label
October : the story of the Russian Revolution
Title
October
Title remainder
the story of the Russian Revolution
Statement of responsibility
China Miéville
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"Acclaimed fantasy author China Mieville plunges us into the year the world was turned upside down The renowned fantasy and science fiction writer China Mieville has long been inspired by the ideals of the Russian Revolution and here, on the centenary of the revolution, he provides his own distinctive take on its history. In February 1917, in the midst of bloody war, Russia was still an autocratic monarchy: nine months later, it became the first socialist state in world history. How did this unimaginable transformation take place? How was a ravaged and backward country, swept up in a desperately unpopular war, rocked by not one but two revolutions? This is the story of the extraordinary months between those upheavals, in February and October, of the forces and individuals who made 1917 so epochal a year, of their intrigues, negotiations, conflicts and catastrophes. From familiar names like Lenin and Trotsky to their opponents Kornilov and Kerensky; from the byzantine squabbles of urban activists to the remotest villages of a sprawling empire; from the revolutionary railroad Sublime to the ciphers and static of coup by telegram; from grand sweep to forgotten detail. Historians have debated the revolution for a hundred years, its portents and possibilities: the mass of literature can be daunting. But here is a book for those new to the events, told not only in their historical import but in all their passion and drama and strangeness. Because as well as a political event of profound and ongoing consequence, Mieville reveals the Russian Revolution as a breathtaking story"--
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Miéville (The Last Days of New Paris) marks the centenary of Russia’s dual 1917 revolutions with this vivid and insightful study of the journey from the February Revolution, which “dispensed breakneck with a half-millennium of autocratic rule,” to Lenin’s October triumph. Situating these eight turbulent months within the city of St. Petersburg, the czarist capital and the birthplace of the uprisings, Miéville writes that the story is “above all the story of its streets.” He leads readers through these streets and the complicated relationships between competing, and often violently opposed, groups of radicals—old and new Bolsheviks, Mensheviks, Socialist Revolutionaries, and others—from workers’ strikes through Lenin’s proclamation of socialism and Russian withdrawal from WWI. Miéville is fully aware of the horrors that followed this massive achievement but convincingly argues that the Russian Revolution’s “degradation was not a given”; its formative moments carried immense potential for every kind of human liberation, which could so easily have become the dominant force of the new order. As an acclaimed storyteller with a doctorate in political philosophy and a commitment to leftist activism, Miéville is an ideal guide through this complex historical moment, giving agency to obscure and better-known participants alike, and depicting the revolution as both a tragically lost opportunity and an ongoing source of inspiration. (May) --Staff (Reviewed 03/06/2017) (Publishers Weekly, vol 264, issue 10, p)
  • Although Tsar Nicholas II and mystic Grigori Rasputin have come to symbolize the Russian Revolution, Miéville (Perdido Street Station) recounts other pivotal figures (and events) in the months leading up to October 1917. The prerevolution months involved key players such as chief of staff Mikhail Alekseyev and Marxist activist Leon Trotsky negotiating first with the Tsar and then with each other. To complicate matters, the minority Mensheviks and Bolsheviks majority could not agree on what a provisional government should look like. Mensheviks believed the liberal bourgeoisie should take power; Bolsheviks argued for the proletariat to become ultimate leaders. Initially, the two parties were able to work together as Bolshevik leaders suggested the bourgeoisie should take power until the proletariat was ready for their own revolution. Although several players are involved, Miéville includes a beneficial glossary of names and a thorough overview of events, successfully tying together their motives and actions. VERDICT This riveting account offers a different aspect of the revolution that changed the course of Russian history. Recommended for all readers.—Sonnet Ireland, St. Tammany Parish P.L., Mandeville, LA --Sonnet Ireland (Reviewed 06/01/2017) (Library Journal, vol 142, issue 10, p120)
  • The award-winning fiction writer revisits the exciting, messy story of an explosive Russia on the brink of civil war.London-born novelist and political theorist Miéville (Three Moments of an Explosion: Stories, 2015, etc.) takes on the roiling events of the Russian Revolution on the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik insurrection. From the beginning of 1917, events occurred at a dizzying pace and involved a rich cast of characters, which the author delineates at the end of the book in a "Glossary of Personal Names." Miéville tells the story in a frank, mannerist fashion. Of course, since readers know the outcome ("purges, gulags, starvation, mass murder"), there is a sense of dark foreboding throughout. The author questions whether it was inevitable that Vladimir Lenin and his cohort would shift increasingly to the left and embrace violent insurrection. No: events were constantly shifting and up in the air, and Miéville presents the action with his novelist's eye. Looking to the "prehistory of 1917," the author chronicles the cataclysmic changes in Russia in the late 19th century especially, including emancipation of the serfs in 1861 by Alexander II, who was assassinated by "People's Will" radicals in 1881. "The man of the future in Russia," noted populist writer Alexander Herzen, "is the peasant." The Marxists believed that autocratic Russia was not yet ripe for socialism. Thus, the events that unfolded over the next two decades, as the working class gained confidence and size, were inchoate until brought into sharper focus by external crises such as the Russo-Japanese War, anti-Jewish pogroms, the institution of a "consultative parliament," the Duma, by Czar Nicolas II, and the deeply unpopular mobilization for war against Germany in 1914. It was a "fraught and protean political culture," as the author writes, juggling the many activist protagonists such as Leon Trotsky, who was working to incorporate the incendiary ideals of Lenin. An intriguing march to revolution, told here with clarity and insight.(Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 2017)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10563198
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Miéville, China
Dewey number
947.0841
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Miéville, China
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • War and society
  • Soviet Union
  • Soviet Union
  • Russia
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the story of the Russian Revolution
Label
October : the story of the Russian Revolution, China Miéville
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 330-341) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • cartographic image
  • still image
  • text
Content type code
  • cri
  • sti
  • txt
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
Machine generated contents note: 1.The Prehistory of 1917 -- 2.February: Joyful Tears -- 3.March: `In So Far As' -- 4.April: The Prodigal -- 5.May: Collaboration -- 6.June: A Context of Collapse -- 7.July: Hot Days -- 8.August: Exile and Conspiracy -- 9.September: Compromise and Its Discontents -- 10.Red October -- Epilogue: After October
Control code
000059510870
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
369 pages
Isbn
9781784782771
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2016051217
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
YBP13121054
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)956957477
Label
October : the story of the Russian Revolution, China Miéville
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 330-341) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • cartographic image
  • still image
  • text
Content type code
  • cri
  • sti
  • txt
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
Machine generated contents note: 1.The Prehistory of 1917 -- 2.February: Joyful Tears -- 3.March: `In So Far As' -- 4.April: The Prodigal -- 5.May: Collaboration -- 6.June: A Context of Collapse -- 7.July: Hot Days -- 8.August: Exile and Conspiracy -- 9.September: Compromise and Its Discontents -- 10.Red October -- Epilogue: After October
Control code
000059510870
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
369 pages
Isbn
9781784782771
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2016051217
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
YBP13121054
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
System control number
(OCoLC)956957477

Library Locations

    • Lionel Bowen Library and Community CentreBorrow it
      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
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