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The Resource Moshi Moshi, Banana Yoshimoto ; translated by Asa Yoneda

Moshi Moshi, Banana Yoshimoto ; translated by Asa Yoneda

Label
Moshi Moshi
Title
Moshi Moshi
Statement of responsibility
Banana Yoshimoto ; translated by Asa Yoneda
Creator
Contributor
Author
Translator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • jpn
  • eng
Summary
In Moshi-Moshi, Yoshie's much-loved musician father has died in a suicide pact with an unknown woman. It is only when Yoshie and her mother move to Shimo-kitazawa, a traditional Tokyo neighbourhood of narrow streets, quirky shops, and friendly residents that they can finally start to put their painful past behind them. However, despite their attempts to move forward, Yoshie is haunted by nightmares in which her father is looking for the phone he left behind on the day he died, or on which she is trying -- unsuccessfully -- to call him. Is her dead father trying to communicate a message to her through these dreams?
Member of
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • Renowned Japanese author Yoshimoto (The Lake, 2011) presents an intimate portrayal of grief and recovery. The sensational murder-suicide deaths of her father and his lover weigh heavily on Yochan as she tries to find a new life by moving to the town of Shimokitazawa. She and her mother are at the center of this lyrical tale of finding one’s footing in the wake of a shocking personal tragedy. Yoshimoto’s beautiful imagery—the cherry tree in front of the Les Liens bistro where Yochan works, restaurants glowing late at night, the coziness among the restaurant staff members, all captures the spirit of Shimokitazawa and marks Yochan’s slow return to an anchored life. Her relationship with her mother is poignant and refreshingly real, while her forays into romantic relationships with Shintani-kun and her father’s former bandmate, Yamazaki-san, hint at the complexities she’ll continue to navigate. The translator, Yoneda, enables English readers to fully appreciate Yoshimoto’s subdued, yet sharp, rendering of a young woman emerging from grief and moving forward with her dreams. -- Viswanathan, Shoba (Reviewed 11/15/2016) (Booklist, vol 113, number 6, p23)
  • In her deft handling of an unconventional coming-of-age story, Yoshimoto (Kitchen) begins with the mysterious death of Mitsuharu Imoto, keyboard player in the popular rock band Sprout, in what appears to be a “love murder-suicide in a forest in Ibaraki with a woman who’d apparently been a distant relative.” Mitsuharu’s 20-something daughter, Yoshie, wanting to separate herself from the loss of her father, moves from the family’s tony Meguro apartment to the fashionable Tokyo neighborhood of Shimokitazawa, where she discovers her passion in the culinary world. Yoshie’s mother, feeling her husband’s death profoundly despite the salacious circumstances, moves in with her daughter; in their own alternately wise and awkward ways, the two help each other come to terms with their new lives. Yoshie’s recurring dream that her father is trying to contact her on the phone coincides with her exploring her own future and her sexuality with Shintani-kun, a frequent customer at the bistro where Yoshie works, and the older Yamazaki-san, her father’s former bandmate. Poignant and buoyant, Yoshie’s story is a testament to the power of place and memory and the healing properties of time. Her awakening is a feast for the senses—meals prepared and eaten, magical cityscapes explored, “the daily movements and patterns of people I hadn’t even known about a few years ago coming in and out of this town like breath”—mirroring her own burgeoning sense of the world and her acceptance of its vagaries. “There wasn’t a single thing in the world that I could know or decide in advance,” Yoshie decides. Even in the absence of her beloved father, that realization suggests a delightful sense of possibility. (Dec.) --Staff (Reviewed 12/12/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 50, p)
  • Though the award-winning Yoshimoto (Kitchen) grounds her new work in a lurid event—Yocchan has just lost her beloved musician father in a murder-suicide pact with a woman neither she nor her mother knows—the narrative itself is measured, tenderly thoughtful, and wholly free of the sort of over-the-top bathos a less practiced or more desperate writer might proffer. Yocchan tries to recover her equilibrium by moving to a funky Tokyo neighborhood called Shimokitkitazawa and ambitiously begins working at the French bistro Les Liens. She's initially upset when her mother says she wants to move in with her temporarily but then changes her perspective: "I'm on vacation, and Mom's just visiting. No big deal." Speaking with colleagues about her father, Yocchan uncovers details about his death and forges ahead, even as her mother liberates herself from her conservative matron role. Though the two imagine that Yocchan's father is trying to contact them, their healing comes all on their own. VERDICT Refreshingly realistic; a lovely work for most fiction readers. --Barbara Hoffert (Reviewed 12/01/2016) (Library Journal, vol 141, issue 20, p91)
  • A young Japanese woman is left hurt, confused, and lost in the wake of her father’s mysterious death. Prolific novelist Yoshimoto (The Lake, 2011, etc.) offers another story of youth, grief, and redemption in this ephemeral yet lovely portrait of an unformed woman. The narrator here is Yocchan, who's fled her childhood home for the hip urban district of Shimokitazawa in central Tokyo to seek work and independence. A year ago, her musician father, Imo, was found dead in a murder-suicide with a mysterious woman in a forest. The story, like many of Yoshimoto’s arcs, is one in which there’s little real drama, yet a pressing emotional alchemy emerges that leaves everyone changed at the end. Yocchan struggles but doesn't give up, pressing ahead with her new job at a French bistro and flirting with a handsome admirer, Shintani-kun. Her mother, haunted by her husband’s ghost, moves in with her daughter in her small apartment and struggles to remake her own life. “We each had to live our own battles,” Yocchan confesses. “We could hardly give up and die; and if we had to live, we’d have to rely on what we were made of.” Along the way, there are delicate and vivid descriptions of food, work, loneliness, and human connection, too, painted with subtle yet heartfelt language. Yocchan enters a relationship with Shintani-kun yet finds herself drawn to Yamazaki-san, an older man who was a band mate of her father's. The book culminates in a ceremony to free her father’s spirit and a tipping point that leaves Yocchan on the verge of leaving for Paris and, as all young people do, standing on the precipice of becoming her adult self. A fleeting portrait of a critical moment in a young woman’s life, one with which the late John Hughes might have felt some kinship.(Kirkus Reviews, October 1, 2016)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10543274
Cataloging source
YDXCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1964-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Yoshimoto, Banana
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Language note
Translated into English from the Japanese
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Yoneda, Asa
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Fathers and daughters
  • Grief
  • Mother and child
  • Tokyo (Japan)
Target audience
adult
Label
Moshi Moshi, Banana Yoshimoto ; translated by Asa Yoneda
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
"Japanese original edition published by the Mainichi Newspapers. English translation rights arranged with Banana Yoshimoto through ZIPANGO, S.L. and Michael Kevin Staley." -- Title page verso
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • still image
  • text
Content type code
  • sti
  • txt
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
000059029722
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
Counterpoint edition.
Extent
206 pages
Isbn
9781619027862
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
regular print
System control number
(OCoLC)941875634
Label
Moshi Moshi, Banana Yoshimoto ; translated by Asa Yoneda
Publication
Copyright
Note
"Japanese original edition published by the Mainichi Newspapers. English translation rights arranged with Banana Yoshimoto through ZIPANGO, S.L. and Michael Kevin Staley." -- Title page verso
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • still image
  • text
Content type code
  • sti
  • txt
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
000059029722
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
Counterpoint edition.
Extent
206 pages
Isbn
9781619027862
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
regular print
System control number
(OCoLC)941875634

Library Locations

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      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
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