Coverart for item
The Resource I see the sun in China : Wo kan zai Zhongguo shang kong de tai yang, zuo zhe, Dedie King ; cha tu, Judith Inglese = written by Dedie King ; illustrated by Judith Inglese ; [translation by Yan Zhang ; calligraphy by Han Zhang]

I see the sun in China : Wo kan zai Zhongguo shang kong de tai yang, zuo zhe, Dedie King ; cha tu, Judith Inglese = written by Dedie King ; illustrated by Judith Inglese ; [translation by Yan Zhang ; calligraphy by Han Zhang]

Label
I see the sun in China : Wo kan zai Zhongguo shang kong de tai yang
Title
I see the sun in China
Title remainder
Wo kan zai Zhongguo shang kong de tai yang
Statement of responsibility
zuo zhe, Dedie King ; cha tu, Judith Inglese = written by Dedie King ; illustrated by Judith Inglese ; [translation by Yan Zhang ; calligraphy by Han Zhang]
Title variation
Wo kan zai Zhongguo shang kong de tai yang
Creator
Contributor
Author
Contributor
Illustrator
Translator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • chi
  • eng
  • eng
  • chi
Summary
Follows a young child as she travels from a small town to the city of Shanghai, portraying the events that take place from dawn until night over the course of that one day, in English and Mandarin Chinese
Member of
Review
  • Grades K-2 A young narrator describes an outing to Shanghai spent with her aunt. Together they explore the city, shop at the mall, have tea at a park, eat in a restaurant with her aunt’s friends, walk the Bund, and enjoy a foot massage. At the end of the day, the girl wonders whether her future lies in her village or in a city. The collage art gives a better sense of the city than it does the village. The one illustration of village housing looks oddly suburban. The images of traditional fishing boats and Kwan Yin’s statue provide the only other views of the older way of life. The focus is on urban life in contemporary China, and the pictures portray the city’s energy and modern style. Written in Mandarin Chinese, the English translation is sometimes clunky, for example, describing Grandfather’s tai chi as “energy practice.” American children will need the appended notes to understand this book, which sometimes misses the mark but is a well-intentioned attempt to introduce modern China. -- Perkins, Linda (Reviewed 10-15-2010) (Booklist, vol 107, number 4, p55)
  • K-Gr 2 — Early one morning, a woman and her daughter catch a ferry from their small town on the island of Putuo Shan to Shanghai where the unnamed child will spend the weekend with her aunt. After eating lunch at Auntie's apartment, the two visit a mall and a park. In the evening they have dinner with Auntie's friends at a restaurant, walk along the Bund, and enjoy a foot massage. Back at the apartment, the youngster does her schoolwork while Auntie talks on the phone with her business partner in the U.S. At the end of the day, the child reflects on the choices she will have as she grows up. This bilingual book is one of a series of titles that looks at the cultures of various countries around the world. The glossary and notes give a bit more information about China and define specific items mentioned in the story. The Mandarin is an accurate translation of the English, which is awkward toward the end of the story in part because the use of commas is erratic. The illustrations are done in collage, a combination of cut paper, photographs, and line drawings. The quality of the photographs is uneven, and the overall design of the artwork lacks vigor. While the simple story is pleasing, the book has limited appeal.—Barbara Scotto, Children's Literature New England, Brookline, MA --Barbara Scotto (Reviewed February 1, 2011) (School Library Journal, vol 57, issue 2, p84)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10012572
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1944-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
King, Dedie
Dewey number
[E]
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Language note
Parallel text in simplified Chinese script and English
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 0
  • 2
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Inglese, Judith
  • Yan, Zhang
  • Han, Zhang
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
  • Wo kan tai yang xi lie =
  • I see the sun series
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Children
  • Children's stories
  • Children
  • China
  • China
  • China
Target audience
juvenile
Label
I see the sun in China : Wo kan zai Zhongguo shang kong de tai yang, zuo zhe, Dedie King ; cha tu, Judith Inglese = written by Dedie King ; illustrated by Judith Inglese ; [translation by Yan Zhang ; calligraphy by Han Zhang]
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • still image
  • text
Content type code
  • sti
  • txt
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
000047805052
Dimensions
22 cm.
Extent
39 pages
Isbn
9780981872056
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2010928109
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
colour illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)657594850
Label
I see the sun in China : Wo kan zai Zhongguo shang kong de tai yang, zuo zhe, Dedie King ; cha tu, Judith Inglese = written by Dedie King ; illustrated by Judith Inglese ; [translation by Yan Zhang ; calligraphy by Han Zhang]
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • still image
  • text
Content type code
  • sti
  • txt
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
000047805052
Dimensions
22 cm.
Extent
39 pages
Isbn
9780981872056
Isbn Type
(pbk.)
Lccn
2010928109
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
colour illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)657594850

Library Locations

    • Margaret Martin LibraryBorrow it
      Level 1, Royal Randwick Shopping Centre, Randwick, NSW, 2031, AU
      -33.9151421 151.2408898
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