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The Resource I am forbidden : a novel, Anouk Markovits

I am forbidden : a novel, Anouk Markovits

Label
I am forbidden : a novel
Title
I am forbidden
Title remainder
a novel
Statement of responsibility
Anouk Markovits
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A novel spanning four decades, from pre-World War II Transylvania to contemporary New York, looks at the cause and effect of both belief and non-belief within the Jewish religion, in a tale that focuses on the relationship of two sisters within a Hasidic sect
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ In this English-language debut, set around WWII, Markovits tells a story of miraculous happenings. A Hasidic boy, saved when his family is killed, in turn saves a girl whose family has tried to flee with their beloved rabbi. Returned to the remnants of the community, then separated, they reunite in Brooklyn, where the rabbi is rebuilding the Satmar community, replicating every tradition, ritual, and law of the old world. But miracles and rituals and laws—even when designed to bring followers closer to God—come at a price, and Markovits pays scrupulous attention to those as well. Tracing the Stern family from Transylvania to Paris and Brooklyn, she focuses on daughter Atara and adopted daughter Mila, closer than close, until Atara wants more than the Satmar world can offer. Atara leaves; Mila stays, desperately trying to accommodate belief and desire. When she comes up with a theological work-around, we not only sympathize but understand; it is, after all, no more tangled and self-serving than the explanation of how the rabbi made it out of Europe. Raised in a Satmar home, Markovits plays fair: the believers are not stupid; their harsh world has beauty. We dwellers in the modern world know what “should” happen, but Markovits shows why, for those in the other world, it’s not that simple. (May) --Staff (Reviewed March 5, 2012) (Publishers Weekly, vol 259, issue 10, p)
  • "I am forbidden, so are my children and my children's children, forbidden for ten generations male or female." With this opening line, Markovits immediately draws the reader in to a family saga of faith and long-hidden secrets, set among the Hasidic Jews of eastern Europe and spanning four generations. The story focuses on Atara, who rebels against the strict rules and rituals of her culture, and adopted sister Mila, who finds comfort and stability within the faith but struggles when she is unable to conceive a child. Raised in France, where she attended a religious seminary in lieu of high school, Markovits deftly weaves in copious information about Hasidic beliefs and the varieties of Jewish political thought during the 20th century while keeping the story intimate. Most important, she does not judge her characters but sympathizes with the human struggle in each, from Atara's rigidly devout Rebbe Zalman Stern, to Josef Lichtenstein, who can never quite forget the Christian woman who raised him as her own son during the war, to Atara herself, who thirsts for knowledge forbidden to her as a woman. VERDICT A stunning novel, the author's first in English; highly recommended.— Christine DeZelar-Tiedman, Univ. of Minnesota Libs., Minneapolis --Christine DeZelar-Tiedman (Reviewed February 1, 2012) (Library Journal, vol 136, issue 22, p59)
  • Orphaned during the Holocaust, two ultra-orthodox Jews bound by love and faith are driven apart by the same forces in a sensitive consideration of tradition and commitment. French-raised Markovits' English-language debut opens in Manhattan in 2005 with the meeting of two women: Atara, who, like the author, fled her Hasidic family to avoid an arranged marriage; and Judith, the granddaughter of Atara's adopted sister, burdened by a cataclysmic secret. Then the clock turns back to Transylvania in 1939, where Josef witnesses the murder of his family and is taken in by a Catholic farmer, and Mila is saved by Josef when her parents are murdered too. Rabbi Stern later rescues Josef and sends him to the U.S. while taking Mila into his own family. Stern's daughter Atara starts to question her father's beliefs and expectations, including limited education for women, and also researches a dark episode of Holocaust history involving Mila's parents and a revered Hasidic rabbi whose escape from Europe may have come at a very high price. When Mila and Josef marry, Atara abandons her family and disappears. The years pass but Mila doesn't conceive. Finally, when she does, desperate choices have been made by both husband and wife. Decades later, matters come full circle as Judith and Atara choose what matters most. Less a commercial family saga, more a sober, finely etched scrutiny of extreme belief set in a female context.(Kirkus Reviews, April 1, 2012)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10107520
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Markovits, Anouk
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Sisters
  • Family secrets
Label
I am forbidden : a novel, Anouk Markovits
Instantiates
Publication
Control code
000047970712
Dimensions
22 cm.
Extent
302 p.
Isbn
9780307984739
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Label
I am forbidden : a novel, Anouk Markovits
Publication
Control code
000047970712
Dimensions
22 cm.
Extent
302 p.
Isbn
9780307984739
Isbn Type
(hbk.)

Library Locations

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      Level 1, Royal Randwick Shopping Centre, Randwick, NSW, 2031, AU
      -33.9151421 151.2408898
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