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The Resource Henny, Elizabeth Rose Stanton

Henny, Elizabeth Rose Stanton

Label
Henny
Title
Henny
Statement of responsibility
Elizabeth Rose Stanton
Creator
Author
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Henny, a chicken who has arms instead of wings, sometimes likes that she is different but other times worries about her inability to do things the same way as the other chickens before learning to embrace her individuality
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Preschool-Grade 1 This Henny is no regular sky-is-falling chick. She has arms! (A helpful chart compares a normal chick with Henny: wattles, yes; combs, yes; wings, uh, no.) Henny has mixed feelings about her arms. They can flutter—but they can also drag. Should she be left-handed? Or right-handed? Should she use deodorant? All ambivalence disappears, however, when Henny gets a taste of working on the farm. Milking cows and feeding chicks empowers her, and she begins to consider all the other things she might be able to do, including picking up her grain with chopsticks and combing her comb. Ultimately, all these possibilities lead to—maybe—a career as a pilot. The plot is thin, but the premise is clever, and the execution is hysterical. In part, this comes from Stanton’s expert depiction of Henny as fair, round, bemused, and rather feminine (except for those long hairy arms). And in part it comes from the clever, unlikely scenarios in which she places her heroine. The matter-of-fact tone of the text elevates the weirdness of the juxtapositions. For those who want a little more meat on their drumstick, this does have a good message about making the best of one’s circumstances and looking on the bright side. But mostly, it’s just funny. -- Cooper, Ilene (Reviewed 01-01-2014) (Booklist, vol 110, number 9, p98)
  • Readers will do a double take at the confident chicken who waves hello from the cover of Stanton’s debut. Instead of feathery wings, Henny has skinny pink human arms and hands. Although “Henny’s mother... loved Henny anyway,” the other farm animals stare and even chortle. Henny frets, albeit in non-chickenish ways: “She worried about being right-handed or left-handed.... She even worried about things she didn’t quite understand—like tennis elbow, and hangnails, and whether she might need deodorant.” Henny eventually discovers a talent for farm chores and starts “to imagine all the other things she could do,” from hailing a cab to flying (a plane). In gentle pencil-and-watercolor sketches on an eggshell-white ground, Stanton scatters moments of quiet humor like chicken feed—Henny tries to “fit in” with a common chicken pose, folding her arms back like wings, and she bends those same elbows when she covers her ears to dampen a rooster’s crow. It’s a somewhat facile story of difference, but Stanton’s artwork marks her as a talent worth watching. Ages 4–8. Agent: Joanna Volpe, New Leaf Literary & Media. (Jan.) --Staff (Reviewed October 21, 2013) (Publishers Weekly, vol 260, issue 42, p)
  • Henny is a chicken but with human arms. (Best not overthink the hows and whys.) She likes being different from her fellow chickens when she's climbing a tree, but she doesn't like being different when the other farm animals laugh at her. In other words, she is Everychicken. Henny's disproportionately long, spindly, pinkish human arms are particularly creepy to behold, partly due to the soft, delicate nature of the debut author/illustrator's pencil-and-watercolor illustrations. They allow her certain luxuries foreign to her species, such as hugging her mother and helping Mr. Farmer with his chores. And, somewhat unsettlingly, "She liked it when they fluttered behind her like ribbons when she ran." (Sometimes her arms are shown as boneless, sometimes not.) In time, the barnyard bird begins to imagine hailing New York taxis, ice-skating, even flying a plane. Unfortunately, there's no cohesive narrative here, mostly just abundant illustrated examples of what can be accomplished with arms and hands. As Henny worries about tennis elbow and hangnails, imagines pointing or "mak[ing] a point," plugs her ears or carries a purse, readers may stop caring what Henny can or can't do. Whether or not children find a friend in Henny, this picture book needs a storyline. (Picture book. 4-8)(Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2013)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10248210
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Stanton, Elizabeth Rose
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • -1
  • 1
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Self-acceptance
  • Individuality
  • Chickens
  • Individuality
  • Self-acceptance
  • Chickens
Target audience
juvenile
Label
Henny, Elizabeth Rose Stanton
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"A Paula Wiseman book."
Carrier category
volume
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Control code
000052413379
Dimensions
27 cm.
Edition
First edition.
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Form of item
regular print reproduction
Isbn
9781442484368
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Other physical details
color illustrations
Label
Henny, Elizabeth Rose Stanton
Publication
Note
"A Paula Wiseman book."
Carrier category
volume
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Control code
000052413379
Dimensions
27 cm.
Edition
First edition.
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Form of item
regular print reproduction
Isbn
9781442484368
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Other physical details
color illustrations

Library Locations

    • Margaret Martin LibraryBorrow it
      Level 1, Royal Randwick Shopping Centre, Randwick, NSW, 2031, AU
      -33.9151421 151.2408898
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