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The Resource Hacking Darwin : genetic engineering and the future of humanity, Jamie Metzl

Hacking Darwin : genetic engineering and the future of humanity, Jamie Metzl

Label
Hacking Darwin : genetic engineering and the future of humanity
Title
Hacking Darwin
Title remainder
genetic engineering and the future of humanity
Statement of responsibility
Jamie Metzl
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"When we can engineer our future children, massively extend our lifespans, build life from scratch, and recreate the plant and animal world, should we?... From leading geopolitical expert and technology futurist Jamie Metzl comes a groundbreaking exploration of the many ways genetic-engineering is shaking the core foundations of our lives -- sex, war, love, and death.At the dawn of the genetics revolution, our DNA is becoming as readable, writable, and hackable as our information technology. But as humanity starts retooling our own genetic code, the choices we make today will be the difference between realising breathtaking advances in human well-being and descending into a dangerous and potentially deadly genetic arms race. Enter the laboratories where scientists are turning science fiction into reality. Look towards a future where our deepest beliefs, morals, religions, and politics are challenged like never before and the very essence of what it means to be human is at play."--Page [2] of cover
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • A species-wide dialogue about what it is to “be human” must start as soon as possible, writes Mezl (Genesis Code), a member of the Council of Foreign Relations and Clinton administration staffer, in this urgent treatise on genetic engineering. Metzl provides the necessary background to his discussion: in 2004, four clinics in China helped couples genetically analyze their embryos and thus optimize gene disorder–free births, a process known as preimplantation genetic testing (PGT). By 2016, those clinics numbered 40, some operating “on a colossal scale” and establishing China as the leading country for carrying out this process. The next step, Metzl argues, is genetically altering embryos to “optimize” them further, such as by increasing intelligence or strength. While science-savvy readers are unlikely to find these details particularly revelatory, Metzl brings an unusual degree of urgency to his policy recommendations. To prevent “a never ending process of creating and rewriting the code of life” from getting out of hand, he recommends that humanity build a “global regulatory structure,” like that governing nuclear energy. Reflecting his background in think tanks and government, rather than in science or science writing, Metzl’s focus is squarely on the societal implications of his subject, not its technical nuts and bolts. The result is a highly readable compendium of next-gen advice for the implementation and management of next-gen science. Agent: Jill Marsal, Marsal Lyon Literary Agency. (Apr.)
			 --Staff (Reviewed 01/31/2019) (Publishers Weekly, vol 266, issue 6, p)
  • Numerous books explain the genetic revolution now in progress; this one describes where it might lead, and it's a wild ride. "Hacking" is the unauthorized intrusion into a computer system, usually to alter its software. Some prefer the term "genetic engineering" to describe the process of changing an organism's DNA to produce useful products or, more recently, correct defects. Futurist Metzl (Eternal Sonata, 2016, etc.), a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council who has also served in the State Department and the White House, maintains that this process will become so routine that most of us will not understand what's happening and those that do might disapprove. In short, we will be hacked. One technique does not involve manipulating DNA. In today's in vitro fertilization, doctors pick among multiple eggs, perhaps test for a few traits, usually absence of some defect, and implant a selection. Advances will enable a mother to produce huge numbers of eggs and doctors to test for countless traits—e.g., resistance to diseases, personality, even longevity—before implanting the best. The obvious next step is to remove defects or insert improved DNA into the genome. The new, Nobel-worthy CRISPR breakthrough makes this not only possible, but practical, and the first applications are emerging from the laboratory. Metzl's explanation of how CRISPR works is no more comprehensible than those of earlier authors, but its dazzling possibilities are obvious. In future decades, advanced IVF will increasingly compete with sex as the primary way we procreate. Metzl devotes plenty of space to the fierce ethical debate, but the reality is that, given the choice, few parents are likely to choose "natural" reproduction and bear a child guaranteed to be less intelligent, talented, and healthy than otherwise. A thoughtful, exciting, and mostly accessible account of how genetic manipulation will vastly improve our species. Miracles will happen, if not quite yet. Maybe in a few years.... (Kirkus Reviews, February 1, 2019)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10774355
Cataloging source
NLM
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Metzl, Jamie Frederic
Dewey number
576.5
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Genetic engineering
  • Human genetics
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
genetic engineering and the future of humanity
Label
Hacking Darwin : genetic engineering and the future of humanity, Jamie Metzl
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 269-306) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • still image
  • text
Content type code
  • sti
  • txt
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
Where Darwin meets Mendel -- Climbing the complexity ladder -- Decoding identity -- The end of sex -- The divine sparks and pixie dust -- Rebuilding the living world -- Stealing immortality from the gods -- The ethics of engineering ourselves -- We contain multitudes -- The arms race of the human race -- The future of humanity
Control code
000063925739
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xxiii, 326 pages
Isbn
9781492670094
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1040198428
Label
Hacking Darwin : genetic engineering and the future of humanity, Jamie Metzl
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 269-306) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • still image
  • text
Content type code
  • sti
  • txt
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
Where Darwin meets Mendel -- Climbing the complexity ladder -- Decoding identity -- The end of sex -- The divine sparks and pixie dust -- Rebuilding the living world -- Stealing immortality from the gods -- The ethics of engineering ourselves -- We contain multitudes -- The arms race of the human race -- The future of humanity
Control code
000063925739
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xxiii, 326 pages
Isbn
9781492670094
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)1040198428

Library Locations

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      -33.9151421 151.2408898
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