Coverart for item
The Resource Exploring the Pacific, Martha Vail

Exploring the Pacific, Martha Vail

Label
Exploring the Pacific
Title
Exploring the Pacific
Statement of responsibility
Martha Vail
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Tide beating heart of the Earth"--The first Pacific explorers--Europeans encounter the Pacific, from East and West--Magellan's circumnavigation, 1519-1522-Conquista Espiritual: The Spanish in the Pacific--Exploration in the Service of Commerce--Exploration in the Service of Empire--James Cook and the Endeavour--Cook's Pacific--Science and empire
Member of
Biography type
contains biographical information
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Vail, Martha
Dewey number
910.9
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1931-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Isserman, Maurice
  • Bowman, John Stewart
  • Vail, Martha
Series statement
Discovery & exploration
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Explorers
  • Discoveries in geography
  • Erforschung
  • Explorers
  • Pacific Area
  • Pazifischer Ozean
  • Pacific Ocean
Target audience
juvenile
Label
Exploring the Pacific, Martha Vail
Link
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0416/2004006807.html
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Machine derived contents note: Contents -- Introduction -- 1. "Tide Beating Heart Of The Earth" -- Map 1: Abraham Ortelius "Typus Orbus Terrarum," 1570 -- 2. The First Pacfic Explorers -- Early Pacific Navigation -- Art of the Pacific Peoples -- Map 2: Discovery and Settlement of the South Pacific, 40,000 BC-500 A. D. -- Map 3: Voyages of Cheng Ho, 1431-1433 -- 3. Europeans Encounter The Pacific, From East To West -- The Spice Trade -- Map 4: The Spice Trade Route, 100-1500 A. D. -- Map 5: Dias Finds the Cape of Good Hope, 1488 -- Vasco da Gama reaches India, 1497-1499 -- Map 6: Journey of Vasco Núñez de Balboa, 1511-1513 -- 4. Magellan'S Circumnavigation, 1519-1522 -- Mutiny -- Circumnavigation and Privateers -- Map 7: Magellan Finds the Strait, 1520 -- Map 8: Magellan's Expedition Circumnavigates the Earth, 1519-1521 -- 5. Conquista Espiritual: The Spanish In The Pacific -- Women, Slaves, and Colonists -- Sixteenth-Century Navigation and Ships -- Map 9: Mendaña Explores the Solomon Islands, 1567-1569 -- Map 10: Mendaña Establishes a Colony, 1595 -- Map 11: Quirós and Torres in Espíritu Santo, 1605-1606 -- 6. Exploration In The Service Of Commerce -- Cartography -- The Painted Prince: Pacific Travelers in Europe -- Map 12: Willem Janz Explores New Guinea, 1606 -- Map 13: Le Maire and Schouten Venture in to the South Pacific, 1615-1616 -- Map 14: Abel Tasman Sails to Tasmania, New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga, 1642-1644 -- Map 15: Roggeveen Lands at Easter Island, 1721 -- 7. Exploration In The Service Of Empire -- The Real Robinson Crusoe -- The South Sea Bubble -- Map 16: Dampier Reaches Australia and New Guinea, 1699-1700 -- Map 17: Byron, Wallis, and Carteret In the Pacific, 1764-1767 -- 8. James Cook And The Endeavour -- Artists Aboard -- Scurvy -- Map 18: The Voyage of the Endeavour, 1768-1771 -- Map 19: Cook in New Zealand, 1768-1771 -- 9. Cook'S Pacific -- The Northwest Passage -- Mark Twain on the Death of Cook -- Map 20: The First Voyage of the Resolution, 1772-1775 -- Map 21: The Second Voyage of the Resolution, 1776-1780 -- 10. Science And Empire -- Whaling -- Gaugin and Robert Louis Stevenson in Paradise -- Map 22: Darwin and the Beagle, 1831-1836 -- Map 23: The Wilkes Expedition, 1838-1842 -- Map 24: European Colonial Possessions, 1898 -- Glossary -- Further Reading -- Index -- <introduction> -- Introduction -- The famous words of James Cook, "ambition leads me not only farther than any man has been before me, but as far as I think it is possible for men to go," are found in collections of quotations, on inspirational posters, and somewhere in most books about Cook. The real nature of Cook's greatness is revealed when the January 30, 1774 entry from his journal continues. Cook's ships, the Resolution and the Adventure, had sailed far below the Antarctic Circle. At 71° south latitude a wall of ice forced Cook to turn his ships around. Cook "was not sorry at meeting with this interruption as it in some measure relieved us from the dangers and hardship, inseparable with the Navigation of the Polar Region." -- Cook, the greatest explorer of the Pacific-and perhaps of any region on earth-was no coward. His genius was in calculating the measure of danger and hardship his men and ships could endure to expand the limits of the known world. The history of exploration in the Pacific is one of courage, of risk, of happy accident. But it is also one of misery beyond words, cruelty, and tragedy. It is not the story of men and ships, even brave men like Cook and gallant ships like the Resolution. Rather, exploration of the Pacific has been a vast mirror of the world's history, from the earliest ocean voyaging to the trade routes that link the West and the East to our day. -- Explorers of the Pacific had their most important achievements in expanding geographical knowledge. The maps, charts, paintings, and reports generated during voyages of discovery document a monumental increase in human understanding. Polynesian voyagers crafted stick charts guide traders and settlers from one island to another lying far beyond the horizon. Luiz Vaez de Torres charted a course through channel between Australia and New Guinea still used by supertankers navigating the strait that bears his name. As John Locke wrote in a 1704 collection about voyages of discovery, "the Relation of one traveller is an Incentive to stir up another to imitate him..." Exploration was fundamentally path breaking, an opening of new places to following generations of traders, soldiers, scientists, settlers, and tourists. -- Much of the exploration of the Pacific was significant for what was not discovered. In the second century, A.D., Egyptian geographer Ptolemy argued that a huge landmass must exist in the southern hemisphere. A thousand years later Marco Polo speculated that this great continent, rich in gold and populated by millions of souls, awaited European ships venturing beyond the fabled Spice Islands. Five hundred years of exploration was driven by the quest for Terra Australis Incognita. The possibility that a Northwest Passage to the Pacific existed on the American continent tantalized European scholars, politicians, and explorers for centuries. In searching for the passage, explorers from France, Spain, Russia, England, and the United States documented the west coast of North America and ventured into the Arctic. -- Each ship that ventured into the Pacific around the Cape of Good Hope, through the Strait of Magellan, or around Cape Horn carried a cargo of national hope and ambition. The Pacific, perhaps even more than the Americas or Africa, became the game board for a global game of imperial chess. Early expeditions aimed to wrestle control of the spice trade from Arab hands and to convert millions to Christianity. By the seventeenth century the nations of Europe sent their ships to gain markets for all sorts of goods. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, expeditions sailed to demonstrate scientific or technological superiority, to establish colonies, and to annex strategic military positions. Remote from the islands of the Pacific, struggles for domination of the European continent such as the War of the Spanish Succession profoundly affected the destiny of island peoples. By the twentieth century, only the most remote and inhospitable islands were free from American, European, or South American colonial administration. -- Both a product and an object of exploration, scientific discovery occurs as persistent theme in the exploration of the Pacific. Even before expeditions undertook explicitly scientific missions in the eighteenth century, ships' logs and sailors' journals were full of observations about the natural world. Francisco Antonio Pigafetta, whose journal contains the best account of Magellan's circumnavigation, observed the behavior of the fish he saw in mid-ocean, "There are three sorts of fish in this ocean a cubit or more in length...These follow and hunt another kind of fish which flies and which we called Colondriny [sea swallow]." Only through the application of known theories and experimentation on his ships was Cook able to devise a method for preventing scurvy that saved thousands of lives. Scientists accompanying Cook, Bougainville, Vancouver made major contributions in the fields of astronomy, navigation, botany, and zoology. In the late nineteenth century the Pacific incubated an entirely new field of science, oceanography, which continues to drive exploration of its darkest depths. -- Explorers introduced newfound lands to all sorts of change and exchange. Polynesian rafts brought sweet potatoes, breadfruit trees, and pigs as well as settlers to far-flung islands. Recent work by anthropologists and archeologists such as Patrick Kirch traces the expansion of human settlement in the Pacific by documenting human remains, plants, and domesticated animals. Geneticists like Anne Gibbons have suggested that distinctions between Melanesian, Micronesian, and Polynesian peoples are artificial. Rather than describing real racial differences, the terms should be understood as broad definitions of geographic regions and cultural groups. Biological change and exchange marked the European exploration of the Pacific as well. Some change was one sided and devastating, as disease more than decimated the populations of many islands. Some exchange was reciprocal. When Samuel Wallis planted English cherry trees on Tahiti, he marked the Pacific landscape with the biology of Europe. When David Nelson brought plants from the Pacific to the Royal Botanic Gardens, the flora of the Pacific changed the English landscape. -- Cultural change and exchange are equally important in the history of Pacific exploration. Strikingly similar patterns can be found on pottery, carving, and tattoos throughout the Pacific, indicating vast and ancient networks of trade and settlement. Linguistic and religious similarities speak to such connections as well. Europeans entered this connected, yet diverse, world of the Pacific with a worldview that characterized its people as "savages" in need of civilizing and "heathens" in need of christianizing. By the eighteenth century, European attitudes about native peoples shifted somewhat. Islanders were seen as living in a perfect state of nature, and even those Pacific natives who traveled to Europe were exhibited as "noble savages." -- James Cook was asked that his first expedition record the "Features, Complection, Dress
Control code
000025446362
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xiii, 162 p.
Isbn
9780816052585
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2004006807
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
ill., maps
System control number
(OCoLC)54865189
Label
Exploring the Pacific, Martha Vail
Link
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0416/2004006807.html
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Machine derived contents note: Contents -- Introduction -- 1. "Tide Beating Heart Of The Earth" -- Map 1: Abraham Ortelius "Typus Orbus Terrarum," 1570 -- 2. The First Pacfic Explorers -- Early Pacific Navigation -- Art of the Pacific Peoples -- Map 2: Discovery and Settlement of the South Pacific, 40,000 BC-500 A. D. -- Map 3: Voyages of Cheng Ho, 1431-1433 -- 3. Europeans Encounter The Pacific, From East To West -- The Spice Trade -- Map 4: The Spice Trade Route, 100-1500 A. D. -- Map 5: Dias Finds the Cape of Good Hope, 1488 -- Vasco da Gama reaches India, 1497-1499 -- Map 6: Journey of Vasco Núñez de Balboa, 1511-1513 -- 4. Magellan'S Circumnavigation, 1519-1522 -- Mutiny -- Circumnavigation and Privateers -- Map 7: Magellan Finds the Strait, 1520 -- Map 8: Magellan's Expedition Circumnavigates the Earth, 1519-1521 -- 5. Conquista Espiritual: The Spanish In The Pacific -- Women, Slaves, and Colonists -- Sixteenth-Century Navigation and Ships -- Map 9: Mendaña Explores the Solomon Islands, 1567-1569 -- Map 10: Mendaña Establishes a Colony, 1595 -- Map 11: Quirós and Torres in Espíritu Santo, 1605-1606 -- 6. Exploration In The Service Of Commerce -- Cartography -- The Painted Prince: Pacific Travelers in Europe -- Map 12: Willem Janz Explores New Guinea, 1606 -- Map 13: Le Maire and Schouten Venture in to the South Pacific, 1615-1616 -- Map 14: Abel Tasman Sails to Tasmania, New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga, 1642-1644 -- Map 15: Roggeveen Lands at Easter Island, 1721 -- 7. Exploration In The Service Of Empire -- The Real Robinson Crusoe -- The South Sea Bubble -- Map 16: Dampier Reaches Australia and New Guinea, 1699-1700 -- Map 17: Byron, Wallis, and Carteret In the Pacific, 1764-1767 -- 8. James Cook And The Endeavour -- Artists Aboard -- Scurvy -- Map 18: The Voyage of the Endeavour, 1768-1771 -- Map 19: Cook in New Zealand, 1768-1771 -- 9. Cook'S Pacific -- The Northwest Passage -- Mark Twain on the Death of Cook -- Map 20: The First Voyage of the Resolution, 1772-1775 -- Map 21: The Second Voyage of the Resolution, 1776-1780 -- 10. Science And Empire -- Whaling -- Gaugin and Robert Louis Stevenson in Paradise -- Map 22: Darwin and the Beagle, 1831-1836 -- Map 23: The Wilkes Expedition, 1838-1842 -- Map 24: European Colonial Possessions, 1898 -- Glossary -- Further Reading -- Index -- <introduction> -- Introduction -- The famous words of James Cook, "ambition leads me not only farther than any man has been before me, but as far as I think it is possible for men to go," are found in collections of quotations, on inspirational posters, and somewhere in most books about Cook. The real nature of Cook's greatness is revealed when the January 30, 1774 entry from his journal continues. Cook's ships, the Resolution and the Adventure, had sailed far below the Antarctic Circle. At 71° south latitude a wall of ice forced Cook to turn his ships around. Cook "was not sorry at meeting with this interruption as it in some measure relieved us from the dangers and hardship, inseparable with the Navigation of the Polar Region." -- Cook, the greatest explorer of the Pacific-and perhaps of any region on earth-was no coward. His genius was in calculating the measure of danger and hardship his men and ships could endure to expand the limits of the known world. The history of exploration in the Pacific is one of courage, of risk, of happy accident. But it is also one of misery beyond words, cruelty, and tragedy. It is not the story of men and ships, even brave men like Cook and gallant ships like the Resolution. Rather, exploration of the Pacific has been a vast mirror of the world's history, from the earliest ocean voyaging to the trade routes that link the West and the East to our day. -- Explorers of the Pacific had their most important achievements in expanding geographical knowledge. The maps, charts, paintings, and reports generated during voyages of discovery document a monumental increase in human understanding. Polynesian voyagers crafted stick charts guide traders and settlers from one island to another lying far beyond the horizon. Luiz Vaez de Torres charted a course through channel between Australia and New Guinea still used by supertankers navigating the strait that bears his name. As John Locke wrote in a 1704 collection about voyages of discovery, "the Relation of one traveller is an Incentive to stir up another to imitate him..." Exploration was fundamentally path breaking, an opening of new places to following generations of traders, soldiers, scientists, settlers, and tourists. -- Much of the exploration of the Pacific was significant for what was not discovered. In the second century, A.D., Egyptian geographer Ptolemy argued that a huge landmass must exist in the southern hemisphere. A thousand years later Marco Polo speculated that this great continent, rich in gold and populated by millions of souls, awaited European ships venturing beyond the fabled Spice Islands. Five hundred years of exploration was driven by the quest for Terra Australis Incognita. The possibility that a Northwest Passage to the Pacific existed on the American continent tantalized European scholars, politicians, and explorers for centuries. In searching for the passage, explorers from France, Spain, Russia, England, and the United States documented the west coast of North America and ventured into the Arctic. -- Each ship that ventured into the Pacific around the Cape of Good Hope, through the Strait of Magellan, or around Cape Horn carried a cargo of national hope and ambition. The Pacific, perhaps even more than the Americas or Africa, became the game board for a global game of imperial chess. Early expeditions aimed to wrestle control of the spice trade from Arab hands and to convert millions to Christianity. By the seventeenth century the nations of Europe sent their ships to gain markets for all sorts of goods. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, expeditions sailed to demonstrate scientific or technological superiority, to establish colonies, and to annex strategic military positions. Remote from the islands of the Pacific, struggles for domination of the European continent such as the War of the Spanish Succession profoundly affected the destiny of island peoples. By the twentieth century, only the most remote and inhospitable islands were free from American, European, or South American colonial administration. -- Both a product and an object of exploration, scientific discovery occurs as persistent theme in the exploration of the Pacific. Even before expeditions undertook explicitly scientific missions in the eighteenth century, ships' logs and sailors' journals were full of observations about the natural world. Francisco Antonio Pigafetta, whose journal contains the best account of Magellan's circumnavigation, observed the behavior of the fish he saw in mid-ocean, "There are three sorts of fish in this ocean a cubit or more in length...These follow and hunt another kind of fish which flies and which we called Colondriny [sea swallow]." Only through the application of known theories and experimentation on his ships was Cook able to devise a method for preventing scurvy that saved thousands of lives. Scientists accompanying Cook, Bougainville, Vancouver made major contributions in the fields of astronomy, navigation, botany, and zoology. In the late nineteenth century the Pacific incubated an entirely new field of science, oceanography, which continues to drive exploration of its darkest depths. -- Explorers introduced newfound lands to all sorts of change and exchange. Polynesian rafts brought sweet potatoes, breadfruit trees, and pigs as well as settlers to far-flung islands. Recent work by anthropologists and archeologists such as Patrick Kirch traces the expansion of human settlement in the Pacific by documenting human remains, plants, and domesticated animals. Geneticists like Anne Gibbons have suggested that distinctions between Melanesian, Micronesian, and Polynesian peoples are artificial. Rather than describing real racial differences, the terms should be understood as broad definitions of geographic regions and cultural groups. Biological change and exchange marked the European exploration of the Pacific as well. Some change was one sided and devastating, as disease more than decimated the populations of many islands. Some exchange was reciprocal. When Samuel Wallis planted English cherry trees on Tahiti, he marked the Pacific landscape with the biology of Europe. When David Nelson brought plants from the Pacific to the Royal Botanic Gardens, the flora of the Pacific changed the English landscape. -- Cultural change and exchange are equally important in the history of Pacific exploration. Strikingly similar patterns can be found on pottery, carving, and tattoos throughout the Pacific, indicating vast and ancient networks of trade and settlement. Linguistic and religious similarities speak to such connections as well. Europeans entered this connected, yet diverse, world of the Pacific with a worldview that characterized its people as "savages" in need of civilizing and "heathens" in need of christianizing. By the eighteenth century, European attitudes about native peoples shifted somewhat. Islanders were seen as living in a perfect state of nature, and even those Pacific natives who traveled to Europe were exhibited as "noble savages." -- James Cook was asked that his first expedition record the "Features, Complection, Dress
Control code
000025446362
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xiii, 162 p.
Isbn
9780816052585
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2004006807
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
ill., maps
System control number
(OCoLC)54865189

Library Locations

    • Lionel Bowen Library and Community CentreBorrow it
      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
Processing Feedback ...