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The Resource Eventide, Kent Haruf

Eventide, Kent Haruf

Label
Eventide
Title
Eventide
Statement of responsibility
Kent Haruf
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • Haruf continues the story he told so poignantly in his best-selling and highly regarded novel Plainsong (1999), returning to tiny Holt, Colorado, and the cattle ranch of the elderly, laconic, and kind McPheron brothers, Harold and Raymond. The McPherons have long lived and worked together, but instead of being set in their ways, they happily welcomed teenage mother Victoria and her baby girl into their humble home. Now Victoria and Katie are about to move away so that Victoria can attend college. The brothers know that they’re going to miss them, but no one is prepared for the tragedy that befalls Harold. Generous souls step up, and Raymond soldiers on, but others struggle mightily. Mary’s despair over her husband’s defection places her two young daughters in jeopardy. Orphaned 11-year-old DJ sacrifices his boyhood to care for his grandfather. Luther and Betty love their children, but they’re none too bright and not even their caring social worker, Rose, can keep them safe. A master of restraint and a writer of remarkable tenderness and dignity, Haruf tells his characters’ tough stories without omniscient commentary, trusting in the power of straight-ahead prose and realistic predicaments. And readers, grateful for a return visit to archetypal Holt and entranced by the bracing clarity of the wind-chilled open range and the solace of coffee-warm kitchens, will share Haruf’s respect for life’s mysteries and his faith in goodness. -- Donna Seaman (BookList, 04-15-2004, p1405)
  • Adult/High School –In this sequel to Plainsong (Knopf, 1999), Victoria Roubideaux and her baby move from the McPheron ranch to settle into her new life of college and single parenthood. When Harold McPheron is accidentally killed by a bull, his brother, Raymond, tries desperately to cope with the ranch and living by himself. Rose Tyler, a kind, middle-aged social worker, eventually becomes his friend and lover and acts as a balance in his life. Harold becomes a part of the lives of her clients, especially young DJ Kephart, who struggles daily to be both an elementary school child and caregiver to his grandfather. This natural interaction of people thrown together by fate and unplanned circumstances realistically mimics life in general and, specifically, the community life of many small towns. The overall tone of the book offers hope and love despite the stark moments of sadness and grief. Compassion, strength of character, and loving concern for all life become the positive forces that help each of the individuals carry on. This book stands alone, but reading the two novels in sequence gives additional meaning and understanding to the events and characters.–Pam Johnson, Fairfax County Public Library, VA --Pam Johnson (Reviewed October 1, 2004) (School Library Journal, vol 50, issue 10, p198)
  • /* Starred Review */ Haruf's follow-up to the critically acclaimed and bestselling Plainsong is as lovely and accomplished as its predecessor. The aging bachelor McPheron brothers and their beloved charges, Victoria and her daughter, Katie, return (though Victoria quickly heads off to college), and Haruf introduces new folks—a disabled couple and their children, an old man and the grandson who lives with him—in this moving exploration of smalltown lives in rural Holt, Colo. Ranchers Raymond and Harold McPheron have spent their whole lives running land that has been in their family for many generations, so when Harold is killed by an enraged bull, worn-out Raymond faces a void unlike any he has ever known. His subsequent first-ever attempts at courtship and romance are almost heartbreaking in their innocence, but after some missteps, he finds unexpected happiness with kind Rose Tyler. Rose is the caseworker for a poor couple struggling so dimly and futilely to better their lives that it becomes painful to witness. Children play crucial roles in the novel's tapestry of rural life, and they are not spared life's trials. But Haruf's characters, such as 11-year-old orphan DJ Kephart, who cares for his retired railroad worker grandfather, and Mary Wells, whose husband abandons her with two young girls, maintain an elemental dignity no matter how buffeted by adversity. And while there is much sadness and hardship in this portrait of a community, Haruf's sympathy for his characters, no matter how flawed they are, make this an uncommonly rich novel. Agent, Sterling Lord Literistic . (May 9) Forecast: Readers will find that what made Plainsong a bestseller—its humanity, its grace and its moving, heartfelt story—shines again in Eventide. With an announced first printing of 250,000 and an author tour, Haruf's latest should do very, very well . --Staff (Reviewed April 26, 2004) (Publishers Weekly, vol 251, issue 17, p41)
  • /* Starred Review */ Readers familiar with Haruf's Plainsong will remember the McPheron brothers, Raymond and Harold. This new novel opens with the brothers taking Victoria and her little daughter, Katie, off to Fort Collins, where Victoria is due to begin college. Facing a long winter alone, the brothers go back to their routine as cattle ranchers in Holt, CO, where tragedy awaits. In addition to familiar characters, we meet new faces. There is 11-year-old DJ Kephart, who cares for his 75-year-old grandfather. Next door to the Kepharts is Mary Wells, whose husband moved off to Alaska, leaving behind a bereft Mary uninterested in life or her kids. Luther and Betty June Wallace are trying to hang onto their two kids by visiting a social worker and taking parenting classes. But just as they seem to be making some headway, Betty June's no good uncle shows up to wreak havoc. Life is hard in this small rural town, and the problems of abuse, addiction, neglect, divorce, and loneliness are as pervasive as they are in big cities. Through Haruf's crisp, clean prose, we feel the pain of Holt's citizens as they struggle to survive life with hope and dignity. No easy answers here, just honest storytelling that is compelling and rings true. Highly recommended for all collections. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 1/03.]—Robin Nesbitt, Columbus M etropolitan Lib., OH --Robin Nesbitt (Reviewed May 1, 2004) (Library Journal, vol 129, issue 8, p140)
  • /* Starred Review */ Haruf sings the second verse of his moving hymn to life on America's great plains.Eventide is a sequel to the 1999 Plainsong, Haruf's wonderfully straight-talking debut novel about life and work in and around Holt, Colorado, a withering town long miles from Denver and light-years from the coasts. Some of the characters from that first story return in major and minor roles. Harold and Raymond McPheron, a pair of aging bachelor brothers who work the ranch on which they were born, take center stage, and the Guthries, schoolteacher Tom and his motherless boys, move to the wings. Victoria Roubideaux, the young high-school girl who moved in with the McPherons to escape her mother and find refuge during her pregnancy is moving off to Fort Collins with her daughter to go to college. The ranchers, who dearly love her and her daughter, will be bereft in their absence but they have made the move possible. They resume their hard, lonely work, setting great store by Victoria's weekly phone calls. In town, three small families are finding their own hard lives harder. Welfare recipients Betty and Luther Wallace, a couple who should probably be in a group home, are unable to protect their two children either from schoolyard cruelty or from Betty's sadistic prison-bound uncle Hoyt. Mary Wells and her two daughters are living on money sent from Mary's husband in Alaska, but the marriage is broken and Mary will lose her pride and her domestic order. Down the street, ten-year-old DJ Kephart has sole care of his grandfather, a retired railroad man close to the end of a tough life. DJ's sole comfort is his friendship with Dena Wells, Mary's elder daughter. When a bad-tempered bull kills Harold McPherson, Raymond is nearly numb, leaving him vulnerable to—of all things—romance.Melancholy truths set to gorgeous melody. (Kirkus Reviews, April 15, 2004)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
123531
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Haruf, Kent
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • City and town life
  • Psychological fiction
  • Family saga
  • Colorado
Target audience
adult
Label
Eventide, Kent Haruf
Instantiates
Publication
Control code
000024964258
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
299 p.
Form of item
regular print reproduction
Isbn
9780375411588
Isbn Type
(hbk.) :
Lccn
2003060480
Label
Eventide, Kent Haruf
Publication
Control code
000024964258
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
299 p.
Form of item
regular print reproduction
Isbn
9780375411588
Isbn Type
(hbk.) :
Lccn
2003060480

Library Locations

    • Lionel Bowen Library and Community CentreBorrow it
      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
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