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The Resource Drink the tea, Thomas Kaufman

Drink the tea, Thomas Kaufman

Label
Drink the tea
Title
Drink the tea
Statement of responsibility
Thomas Kaufman
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • As a child, Willis Gidney was homeless on the streets of Washington, D.C. Not even knowing his own name, he entered the D.C. juvenile justice system named for the two beat cops who collared him. Juvie made him tough and street-smart. Now 35, he’s a struggling PI. A good friend asks Gidney to find a daughter who has been missing for 25 years. Dead bodies begin to pile up immediately, and Gidney is up to his neck in crooked congressmen, rapacious corporations, hired guns, cynical cops, and devious women. Kaufman, an award-winning cinematographer, has created a wonderful new series hero, a smart, tough, and cocky knight errant scarred by his past but resilient and resourceful. Gidney’s backstory almost takes precedence over the case, but Kaufman artfully weaves them together. His D.C., from the corridors of Capitol Hill to the horrors of juvenile-detention centers, is knowing and vividly evoked. His dialogue is clever and often quirky, and he surrounds Gidney with a host of strong characters. Fans of PI novels will love this one. -- Gaughan, Thomas (Reviewed 02-01-2010) (Booklist, vol 106, number 11, p32)
  • /* Starred Review */ Kaufman, the winner of the PWA Best First Private Eye Novel Competition, introduces an unusual PI, a former foster child, in his impressive debut. Too often in mystery fiction a character’s difficult upbringing is tacked on, but Willis Gidney bears emotional scars from being abandoned that are both convincing and relevant to the story line. Jazz great Steps Jackson, a friend of the D.C. gumshoe, hires Gidney to locate his long-lost daughter. Gidney, who normally serves subpoenas, attracts the interest of a creepy private security firm and an ambitious right-wing politician. After a lead takes him to Colette Andrews, the wife of the former Virginia state attorney general, Colette turns up shot to death, and the police suspect Gidney of having pulled the trigger. While one coincidental development will raise eyebrows, Kaufman, a director and cameraman who twice won the Gordon Parks Award for cinematography, pulls off a taut, compelling tale of violence and corruption. (Mar.) --Staff (Reviewed January 4, 2010) (Publishers Weekly, vol 257, issue 1, p32)
  • When a friend discovers he has a previously unknown daughter, he asks Willis Gidney, a PI in Washington, DC, to find her. But someone is making sure that the people talking to Willis never talk again. VERDICT This winner of the PWA Best First Private Eye Novel Competition exposes the ugly side of our nation's capital. Kaufman, an award-winning director and cinematographer, ties together DC's jazz scene, cut-throat big business, and the destructiveness of reckless ambition. This series debut is worth a look. [Library marketing.] --Jo Ann Vicarel (Reviewed December 15, 2009) (Library Journal, vol 134, issue 20, p88)
  • A D.C. private detective gets into all kinds of trouble trying to find a friend's long-lost daughter.Decades after his affair with Colette Andrews, a gorgeous young fan with whom he long ago lost touch, jazz musician Steps Jackson asks his pal Willis Gidney to find the daughter he never knew. Gidney, a part-time detective who works at a record warehouse, lucks into the name of the young woman—Bobbie—during his first random interview, but gaining traction in the search is another matter. His twisted trail includes, among other fictional D.C. locations, the Money Jungle toy store, the offices of Vital Records and the headquarters of right-wing politician Jason McHugh. When he finally meets Colette and brings up the subject of Bobbie, she threatens to call the police if he doesn't leave. Shortly after, at a small jazz club called The Cove, he gets an unexpected phone call from Colette, who says she needs to see him. The call is interrupted by a pack of unseen thugs who attack Gidney from behind. He blacks out and wakes up a suspect in Colette's murder, a fact that strains Gidney's usually smooth relationship with Washington's finest. Conducting a concurrent investigation threatens it even more.Winner of the Private Eye Writers of America Best First Private Eye Novel Competition, Kaufman's debut feels a little slapdash but benefits from brisk development and a flattering, textured portrait of the nation's capital. Wisecracking narrator Gidney is also an appealing spinner of yarns. (Kirkus Reviews, November 15, 2009)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
339747
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kaufman, Thomas
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Willis Gidney mysteries
Series volume
0001
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Missing persons
  • Corruption
  • Private investigators
  • Daughters
  • Washington (D.C.)
Label
Drink the tea, Thomas Kaufman
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"A Thomas Dunne book."
Control code
000044778469
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
294 p.
Isbn
9780312607302
Lccn
2009041126
System control number
(OCoLC)428026937
Label
Drink the tea, Thomas Kaufman
Publication
Note
"A Thomas Dunne book."
Control code
000044778469
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
294 p.
Isbn
9780312607302
Lccn
2009041126
System control number
(OCoLC)428026937

Library Locations

    • Lionel Bowen Library and Community CentreBorrow it
      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
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