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The Resource Diary of a worm, by Doreen Cronin ; pictures by Harry Bliss

Diary of a worm, by Doreen Cronin ; pictures by Harry Bliss

Label
Diary of a worm
Title
Diary of a worm
Statement of responsibility
by Doreen Cronin ; pictures by Harry Bliss
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
A young worm discovers, day by day, that there are some very good and some not so good things about being a worm in this great big world
Tone
Character
Award
  • Beehive Children's Picture Book Award (Utah), 2005.
  • Chickadee Award (Maine), 2005.
  • Delaware Diamonds (book award), Primary (Grades K-2), 2005.
  • Keystone to Reading Book Award (Pennsylvania), Primary category, 2005.
  • Prairie Bud Children's Book Award (South Dakota), 2006.
  • South Carolina Book Award, Children’s Books, 2006.
  • School Library Journal Best Books, 2003.
Review
  • PreS-Gr. 1. The verbal puns and the wry, colorful cartoons create a funny worm's-eye view of the world in this playful picture book. There's no sustained story here, as there was in Cronin's wonderful Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type (2000), but the hilarious vignettes of the worm-child with his family, friends, and enemies show the absurd in humans as much as in the wriggling creatures in the earth. When the worm forgets his lunch, he eats his homework, and he loves telling his older sister that her face will always look like her rear end. One advantage of being a worm is that he never has to go to the dentist: no cavities. "No teeth, either," says Dr. D. Kay. The pictures are both silly and affectionate, whether the worm holds a pencil or hugs his favorite pile of dirt. And there's always the elemental child appeal of how it feels to be tiny in a world of giants. -- Hazel Rochman (BookList, 10-01-2003, p326)
  • /* Starred Review */ PreS-Gr 3 –A baseball-capped crawler gives readers an episodic glimpse into the vicissitudes of his life in these hilarious diary entries. Difficulties such as having no arms, having a head that looks a lot like your rear end, and facing the dangers imposed by people digging for bait are balanced by a loving family and good friends. The young protagonist describes playing with his friend Spider, engaging in a variety of activities at school, and interacting with his parents and sister. Packed into these droll slice-of-worm-life vignettes are a few facts about earthworms and their behavior, all rendered with a dry sense of humor. The full-color watercolor-and-ink illustrations sprawl across the pages in lush earth tones. Bliss's cartoons give the worms lots of personality without overly anthropomorphizing them. The use of multiple perspectives will have children eagerly looking at the pictures to identify objects and locales. Primary-grade youngsters will especially appreciate the classroom scenes. This quirky worm's-eye view of the world makes these ubiquitous invertebrates a little more understandable and a lot more fun.–Marge Loch-Wouters, Menasha's Public Library, WI --Marge Loch-Wouters (Reviewed October 1, 2003) (School Library Journal, vol 49, issue 10, p116)
  • /* Starred Review */ Cronin's beguiling journal entries by a worm who can write are as witty and original as the missives from her popular cows who can type (Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type ). With his red baseball cap and good-natured humor, the titular hero is a winning American Everyboy, and young readers will identify with his escapades in part because they mirror their own. Bliss's (A Fine, Fine School ) clever endpapers feature photos of the worm on his first day of school and on a family vacation to Compost Island, as well as his report card (he gets an "A" for tunnel, a "Pass" for Squirming). He makes his friend Spider "laugh so hard, he fell out of his tree," and he tells his sister that "her face will always look just like her rear end." But in addition to being like the hero, youngsters will also enjoy seeing their familiar world from a worm's vantage point. "It's not always easy being a worm," he says. One of the bad things is that a worm can't chew gum; one of the good things is that worms never get cavities (they have no teeth, he points out). At a school dance, a line of worms does the hokey pokey, putting their heads in and out and turning themselves about ("That's all we could do"). Bliss's droll watercolor illustrations are a marvel. He gives each worm an individual character with a few deft lines, and the varying perspectives and backgrounds enhance the humor of the text (especially a view from the sidewalk up, illustrating "Hopscotch is a very dangerous game," with a girl's sneakers about to descend). Inventive and laugh-out-loud funny, this worm's-eye view of the world will be a sure-fire hit. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed July 21, 2003) (Publishers Weekly, vol 250, issue 29, p194)
  • /* Starred Review */ Each turn of the page will bring fresh waves of giggles as a young worm records one misadventure after another. He tries to teach his arachnid friend how to dig a tunnel; learns the peril of hanging out on a sidewalk during a game of hopscotch; suffers a nightmare from eating too much garbage before bedtime; makes a one-piece macaroni necklace in art class; earns a parental reprimand for telling his older sister that "no matter how much time she spends looking in the mirror, her face will always look just like her rear end," and much, much more. Bliss gives this limbless young diarist a face and an identifying red cap, adds plenty of sight gags, and just to set the tone, plasters (painted) snapshots on the endpapers captioned "My favorite pile of dirt," "My report card" ("Needs to resist eating homework"), etc., etc. Readers will come away with the insight that worms may not be so good at walking upside down or doing the Hokey Pokey, but they do play an important role in taking care of the Earth. Not so different from us, after all. (Picture book. 6-9) (Kirkus Reviews, August 1, 2003)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
120881
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cronin, Doreen
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • -1
  • 3
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Worms
  • Diary writing
  • Everyday life
  • Families
  • Schools
  • Friendship
  • Diaries
  • Earthworms
Target audience
primary
Label
Diary of a worm, by Doreen Cronin ; pictures by Harry Bliss
Instantiates
Publication
Control code
000023633826
Dimensions
26 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 v. (unpaged)
Isbn
9780060001513
Other physical details
col. ill.
Label
Diary of a worm, by Doreen Cronin ; pictures by Harry Bliss
Publication
Control code
000023633826
Dimensions
26 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
1 v. (unpaged)
Isbn
9780060001513
Other physical details
col. ill.

Library Locations

    • Lionel Bowen Library and Community CentreBorrow it
      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
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