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The Resource Cure, Robin Cook

Cure, Robin Cook

Label
Cure
Title
Cure
Statement of responsibility
Robin Cook
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
With her young son's potentially fatal neuroblastoma in complete remission, New York City medical examiner Laurie Montgomery returns to work, only to face the case of her career. The investigation into the death of CIA agent Kevin Markham is a professional challenge - and has Laurie's colleagues wondering if she still has what it takes after so much time away
Member of
Review
  • Cook’s latest thriller opens not with a microscopic medical event, as so many of his previous novels have, but with theft at a research lab in Kyoto, Japan. The perpetrator is Ben Corey, a doctor and the founder of a company designed to profit from stem cell research, and his crime is stealing away Satoshi Machita, one of Kyoto University’s top researchers. But soon after he sneaks Satoshi and his family into the U.S., Satoshi disappears—the target of an attack orchestrated by the Japanese yakuza and the American Mafia. Satoshi’s body turns up at the Office of the County Medical Examiner in New York City, where Laurie Montgomery, just returned from maternity leave, is assigned the case. Though there’s no identification on the body and he appears to have died of natural causes, Laurie digs deeper, much to the consternation of the killers. When Laurie refuses to back off the case, the Mafia threatens the young son she shares with fellow ME Jack Stapleton. The dialogue is clunky and the mobsters dull, but readers invested in Cook’s married ME duo will rapidly turn the pages as danger finds Laurie and Jack once again. -- Huntley, Kristine (Reviewed 06-01-2010) (Booklist, vol 106, number 19, p4)
  • Organized crime, international espionage, and kidnapping only mildly enliven Cook's methodical ninth medical thriller featuring husband-and-wife medical examiners Laurie Montgomery and Jack Stapleton (after Intervention). Laurie's first case back in the Manhattan medical examiner's office, after giving birth to the couple's firstborn, John "JJ" Junior, appears to be a routine case of death by natural causes. But Laurie suspects otherwise, and her dogged investigation uncovers a diabolical poisoning and a plot involving the Mafia and rival Japanese gangsters laundering money for a shady start-up firm promoting stem-cell research. To deter Laurie's prying, the thugs snatch JJ, and suddenly the intrigue gets very personal. Cook provides an interesting study of the strange bedfellows that the biotech business and the mob might make, but he telegraphs all his plot twists so far in advance that there's little suspense other than how quickly Laurie will tip to them. Even devoted Cook fans may find that the crimes and subterfuges are resolved too swiftly and perfunctorily. (Aug.) --Staff (Reviewed June 28, 2010) (Publishers Weekly, vol 257, issue 25, p)
  • Throw biotech billions, mobsters, Yakuza heavies and brainiac baddies into a metaphorical Mixmaster, whip on high, and you have this soufflé of a thriller from Cook (Intervention, 2009, etc.).  Excepting Victor Frankenstein, lab-based scientists aren't supposed to be adept at breaking and entering. Yet Benjamin Corey, geneticist and entrepreneur, puts himself to service in just that capacity, busting into a Tokyo research center to jack some notebooks owned by one Satoshi Machita, who is just then preparing to jump jobs and make some real dough. Alas, fate has something else in mind for Satoshi, which puts Laurie Montgomery in action. Readers of Cook's other recent offerings will know Laurie as the dazzlingly efficient coroner whose young son was snatched from the jaws of death with the help of a few million stem cells. (Take that, George Bush!) Now it's up to her to determine whether Satoshi's demise was on the up and up, an answer on which the legal ownership of a miracle-medical patent potentially worth a trillion bucks might hinge. Can Big Crime stand up to Big Pharma? Not a chance, but the baddies try, with the Mafia and the Yakuza even joining forces. Cook's thriller satisfies the basic requirements in about the way a Twinkie satisfies the body's need for energy—it does the job, but there's tastier and much more nutritious stuff out there. For one thing, this one has a little too much clumsy exposition and explaining on the fly, with clunky results. Yet Cook's new concoction has plenty of entertaining toxicology and biochem geekery to keep matters instructive, and enough neat twists of the plot to keep them interesting as well. Not Cook's best dish, but a filling snack all the same. (Kirkus Reviews, July 1, 2010)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
352730
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1940-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cook, Robin
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Jack Stapleton and Laurie Montgomery series
Series volume
0010
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Murder
  • Medical examiners (Law)
  • Stem cells
  • Pharmaceutical industry
Target audience
adult
Label
Cure, Robin Cook
Instantiates
Publication
Control code
000045508615
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xv, 396 p.
Form of item
regular print reproduction
Isbn
9780399156625
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Label
Cure, Robin Cook
Publication
Control code
000045508615
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xv, 396 p.
Form of item
regular print reproduction
Isbn
9780399156625
Isbn Type
(hbk.)

Library Locations

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