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The Resource Abundance : the future is better than you think, Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler

Abundance : the future is better than you think, Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler

Label
Abundance : the future is better than you think
Title
Abundance
Title remainder
the future is better than you think
Statement of responsibility
Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The authors document how four forces--exponential technologies, the DIY innovator, the Technophilanthropist, and the Rising Billion--are conspiring to solve our biggest problems. "Abundance" establishes hard targets for change and lays out a strategic roadmap for governments, industry and entrepreneurs, giving us plenty of reason for optimism
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Diamandis, a tech-entrepreneur turned philanthropist, and journalist Kolter (The Angle Quickest for Flight) contend that widespread pessimism about the future is due in part to our cognitive biases and the effects of mass media. Bad news sells newspapers, while good news escapes our attention or remains hidden in statistics. This engaging book is a needed corrective, a whirlwind tour of the latest developments in health care, agriculture, energy, and other fields as well as an introduction to thinkers and innovators such as Daniel Kahneman, Ray Kurzweil, and Craig Ventor. Augmented by the power of exponentially growing technologies, small groups of motivated individuals are accomplishing what used to require the resources of government or large corporations. Other forces driving innovation are infusions of money from techno-billionaires turned philanthropists and the integration of the poorest third of humanity into the global economy. Not every development will be appreciated; steak lovers may not take readily to in-vitro beef. New technologies contain novel risks, including the disquieting fact that robots will soon make up the majority of the blue-collar workforce. Nonetheless, the authors make a compelling case for optimism over dread as we face the exhilarating unknown. Agent: John Brockman, Brockman Inc. (Feb.) --Staff (Reviewed January 2, 2012) (Publishers Weekly, vol 259, issue 01, p)
  • Forget Club of Rome gloom and doom. If the future isn't necessarily bright enough for shades, then, write high-tech pioneer Diamandis and science journalist Kotler (A Small Furry Prayer: Dog Rescue and the Meaning of Life, 2010, etc.), things are going to work out just fine. The title speaks volumes. A tenet of capitalism is that resources are scarce, which justifies our scramble to get what we can. Yet, write the authors, "when seen through the lens of technology, few resources are truly scarce, they're mainly inaccessible." So drinking water is scarce and getting scarcer? There's a big ocean out there; what remains to be done is to develop some method to desalinate the ocean's water "in the same way that electrolysis easily transformed bauxite into aluminum." Of course, there is also a major shortage of fossil fuels--but no shortage of sunlight, and in fact more than 5,000 times as much solar power available as we could possibly use in our wildest dreams. It will bring some readers up short to contemplate the abundance that Diamandis and Kotler project in the face of the stark reality that there may well be 10 billion humans on the planet by the year 2050, but that doesn't daunt the authors much, given the human talent for engineering our way out of trouble. Engineering is a major part of their program, as "the purview of backyard tinkerers has extended far beyond custom cars and homebrew computers, and now reaches into once esoteric fields like genetics and robotics." What about the health-care crisis? Well, nothing a few generations of robotic surgeons can't help, if not cure. Food crisis? Just 150 vertical-farm skyscrapers could feed all of New York City. And so on, to the point that there seems to be no problem that the authors find insurmountable, or even especially daunting. A nicely optimistic look at a matter that usually brings out the darkest thoughts among prognosticators--if a touch starry-eyed, at least a dream worth nurturing.(Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2012)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10083520
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Diamandis, Peter H
Dewey number
303.483
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1967-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Kotler, Steven
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Technological forecasting
  • Technology
  • Technology
  • Technological innovations
  • Technological innovations
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the future is better than you think
Label
Abundance : the future is better than you think, Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [305]-356) and index
Contents
Pt. 1: Perspective. Our grandest challenge -- Building the pyramid -- Seeing the forest through the trees -- It's not as bad as you think -- pt. 2: Exponential technologies. Ray Kurzweil and the go-fast button -- The singularity is nearer -- pt. 3: Building the base of the pyramid. The tools of cooperation -- Water -- Feeding nine billion -- pt. 4: The forces of abundance. The DIY innovator -- The technophilanthropists -- The rising billion -- pt. 5: Peak of the pyramid. Energy -- Education -- Health care -- Freedom -- pt. 6: Steering faster. Driving innovation and breakthroughs -- Risk and failure -- Which way next?
Control code
000048008579
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
1st Free Press hardcover ed.
Extent
xi, 386 p.
Isbn
9781451614213
Other physical details
ill., maps
Label
Abundance : the future is better than you think, Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler
Link
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [305]-356) and index
Contents
Pt. 1: Perspective. Our grandest challenge -- Building the pyramid -- Seeing the forest through the trees -- It's not as bad as you think -- pt. 2: Exponential technologies. Ray Kurzweil and the go-fast button -- The singularity is nearer -- pt. 3: Building the base of the pyramid. The tools of cooperation -- Water -- Feeding nine billion -- pt. 4: The forces of abundance. The DIY innovator -- The technophilanthropists -- The rising billion -- pt. 5: Peak of the pyramid. Energy -- Education -- Health care -- Freedom -- pt. 6: Steering faster. Driving innovation and breakthroughs -- Risk and failure -- Which way next?
Control code
000048008579
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
1st Free Press hardcover ed.
Extent
xi, 386 p.
Isbn
9781451614213
Other physical details
ill., maps

Library Locations

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