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The Resource A short history of nuclear folly, Rudolph Herzog ; translated by Jefferson Chase

A short history of nuclear folly, Rudolph Herzog ; translated by Jefferson Chase

Label
A short history of nuclear folly
Title
A short history of nuclear folly
Statement of responsibility
Rudolph Herzog ; translated by Jefferson Chase
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
In the spirit of Dr. Strangelove and The Atomic Cafe, a blackly sardonic people's history of atomic blunders and near-misses revealing the hushed-up and forgotten episodes in which the great powers gambled with catastrophe
Tone
Review
Brimming with black humor, Herzog (Dead Funny) explores 40 years of lesser-known disasters and near-misses resulting from the development and propagation of nuclear weapons after WWII and throughout the Cold War. These include the contaminated film location for John Wayne's movie The Conqueror—in which nearly half the cast and crew eventually contracted cancer—and a broken nuclear-powered satellite hurtling towards Earth as scientists rushed to predict its landing site. In Brazil, a radiology clinic moved, abandoning a piece of radioactive equipment later dismantled for scrap metal with dire consequences. There are numerous accounts of civilians being harmed, some intentionally like Kazakh villagers living near a Soviet test site, others out of negligence like the Australian Aboriginal tribe caught in a black cloud of radioactive material after British field tests. British military were no kinder to their own, as commanders used recruits to test different safety materials. Herzog also discusses some unsettling, and thankfully unused, plans for nuclear power like building canals and harbors with hydrogen and atomic bombs or blowing up an entire mountain range to build a highway. Herzog's study is a shocking and vitally important reminder that we live in an unsteady nuclear age. (May) --Staff (Reviewed May 13, 2013) (Publishers Weekly, vol 260, issue 19, p)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10175943
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Herzog, Rudolph
Dewey number
363.1799
Index
index present
Language note
Translated from the German
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Chase, Jefferson
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Nuclear accidents
  • Nuclear weapons
  • Nuclear energy
Target audience
adult
Label
A short history of nuclear folly, Rudolph Herzog ; translated by Jefferson Chase
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 231-236) and index
Contents
Machine generated contents note: 1.After the Bomb, the World's Most Dangerous Invention -- 2.The Red Bomb -- 3.The Myth of Tactical Nuclear War -- 4.The Radioactive Cowboy, or. How Alaska Got the Bomb -- 5.Swords into Plowshares -- 6.The Doomsday Machine -- 7.Flying Reactors -- 8.How Safe Is Safe? -- 9.Atomic Australia -- 10.The Deadly Detours of Nuclear Medicine -- 11.Broken Arrows
Control code
000050988728
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
252 p.
Form of item
regular print reproduction
Isbn
9781612191737
Isbn Type
(hbk.)
Label
A short history of nuclear folly, Rudolph Herzog ; translated by Jefferson Chase
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 231-236) and index
Contents
Machine generated contents note: 1.After the Bomb, the World's Most Dangerous Invention -- 2.The Red Bomb -- 3.The Myth of Tactical Nuclear War -- 4.The Radioactive Cowboy, or. How Alaska Got the Bomb -- 5.Swords into Plowshares -- 6.The Doomsday Machine -- 7.Flying Reactors -- 8.How Safe Is Safe? -- 9.Atomic Australia -- 10.The Deadly Detours of Nuclear Medicine -- 11.Broken Arrows
Control code
000050988728
Dimensions
23 cm.
Extent
252 p.
Form of item
regular print reproduction
Isbn
9781612191737
Isbn Type
(hbk.)

Library Locations

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      -33.9151421 151.2408898
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