Coverart for item
The Resource A corpse in the Koryo, James Church

A corpse in the Koryo, James Church

Label
A corpse in the Koryo
Title
A corpse in the Koryo
Statement of responsibility
James Church
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
Library Journal Best Books, 2006.
Review
  • /*Starred Review*/ Inspector O, a North Korean state police officer, is given an unusual assignment: go to a certain part of a certain road at dawn and photograph a certain vehicle. Little does he suspect that this seemingly inconsequential task will escalate into a case that will lead him to risk his job, and his life. The (pseudonymous) author, a veteran intelligence officer, has intimate knowledge of Asian life and politics, and it shows: he gives the North Korea setting a feeling of palpable reality, depicting the nature of daily life under a totalitarian government not just with broad sociopolitical descriptions but also with specific everyday details. Inspector O is completely believable and sympathetic, a working cop who isnt entirely sure he believes in the things his government tells him to believe in. Comparisons to J. Robert Janes series set in occupied France and costarring Gestapo detective Kohler are inevitable, but there is also a little of Martin Cruz Smiths early Arkady Renko novels here. The writing is superb, too, well above the level usually associated with a first novel, richly layered and visually evocative. -- David Pitt (Reviewed 06-01-2006) (Booklist, vol 102, number 19, p43)
  • /* Starred Review */ In an impressive debut that calls to mind such mystery thrillers as Martin Cruz Smith's Gorky Park , the pseudonymous Church, a former intelligence officer, provides a rare look into one of the world's most closed societies, North Korea. When Inspector O, a state security officer, is called on the carpet for botching a sensitive surveillance assignment, O soon realizes that competing forces in the military and intelligence hierarchies set him up to fail and that his personal and professional well-being depend on his walking a tightrope. The detective's pragmatic if unwavering commitment to the ideals of pursuing justice in the face of serious obstacles makes him a heroic figure who's well suited to carry future entries in what one hopes will be a long-lived series. Despite the exotic setting, Hammett and Chandler would have had no problem appreciating this hard-boiled narrative. (Oct.) --Staff (Reviewed July 31, 2006) (Publishers Weekly, vol 253, issue 30, p56)
  • /* Starred Review */ Inspector O of the Pyongyang Police Department is a man alone. His deceased grandfather was a national hero of the revolution, and O's brother is a high-ranking government official who has not spoken to O in years. No one is safe in the paranoia of North Korea's totalitarian regime, as O finds when he gets involved in a case that forces him to leave the city pursued by various factions and finding murder and danger everywhere he goes. For most of us, North Korea is undiscovered terrain. While we do not understand who the players are until well into the story, readers will be richly rewarded by their perseverance. The pseudonymous Church draws on his experience as a former intelligence officer in Asian countries to create believable characters and situations in an outstanding crime novel. Unlike Eliot Pattison's thrillers about Chinese-ruled Tibet and Stuart M. Kaminsky's Inspector Rostnikov mysteries, which introduced Soviet Moscow to the world, this debut holds little hope for the people of the country it depicts. Yet it is a not-to-be-missed reading experience. [See Prepub Mystery, LJ 6/1/06.] --Jo Ann Vicarel (Reviewed August 15, 2006) (Library Journal, vol 131, issue 13, p58)
  • A complex debut mystery introducing Inspector O, who works out of North Korea's Ministry of People's Security.Inspector O thought his mission was a waste of time. He'd been sent to a hilltop to photograph a certain black Mercedes as it passed by, but with usual North Korean inefficiency, the camera didn't work. The task, however, had drawn the attention of his immediate supervisor, Chief Inspector Pak; Deputy Director Kang, of the rival investigative division; and Colonel Kim, from the military security command, who dislikes everyone and has been purging them all with extreme prejudice. Without understanding why, O is sent from headquarters in Pyongyang first to Kanggye, then to Manpo, down to Sinnanpo and finally to Hyangsan. Each stop reveals security headaches, including rival car-smuggling ventures, a Finnish corpse no one wants to claim, a sultry lady who may be a secret agent and intervention by O's disowned brother, whom he hasn't spoken to in five years. As alliances are shuffled, the danger to O escalates. He'll have to identify the killer of a small farm boy before he can understand who has Pak, Kang and him in his sights.Gripping, although a touch inscrutable. The pseudonymous Church, himself a former intelligence officer, doesn't believe in linear plotting but is an admirable stylist. (Kirkus Reviews, August 15, 2006)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
145163
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1947-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Church, James
Dewey number
813.1
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
An Inspector O novel
Series volume
0001
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
Korea (North)
Label
A corpse in the Koryo, James Church
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Paperback ed. published: 2007
  • "An Inspector O novel."
Control code
000042523771
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
280 p.
Isbn
9780312352080
Label
A corpse in the Koryo, James Church
Publication
Note
  • Paperback ed. published: 2007
  • "An Inspector O novel."
Control code
000042523771
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
280 p.
Isbn
9780312352080

Library Locations

    • Lionel Bowen Library and Community CentreBorrow it
      669-673 Anzac Parade, Marouba, NSW, 2035, AU
      -33.938111 151.237977
Processing Feedback ...